future students

Thank you! Your submission has been received!

Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form

search

Bachelor of Arts

Curious about human experience, expression and behaviour?

Bachelor of Arts

Thank you, your enquiry has been received.

You will be contacted regarding your request within two working days.

If you don't hear back please give us a call on 1800 334 733.

CSU's flexible Bachelor of Arts combines generalist skills and specialist vocational training in a combination chosen by the individual student. This course offers a diverse range of majors and minors to provide a good grounding for a career in many fields.

  • Why study this course?

    As a Bachelor of Arts graduate, you will be valued by employers for your ability to gather information, think critically, assess and interpret evidence, and communicate clearly. The course is organised on the basis of a combination of majors and minors and a number of free electives, giving you the opportunity to study subjects you are passionate about across a range of disciplines.

    Majors

    Students can tailor their study experience by selecting from majors that they will study in-depth including Art History, Community Development and Human Services, English, History, Indigenous Studies, Philosophy, Politics, Policy Studies, Psychology and Sociology.

    Minors

    Minor studies allow students to expand on their skills and knowledge in areas that are of interest to them. Minors include: Art History, Children's Literature, Community Development and Human Services, Economics, English, Ethics, History, Indigenous Studies, Justice Studies, Language and Culture, Mathematics, Philosophy, Policy Studies, Politics, Psychology, Sociology, Theology and Writing.

  • Career opportunities

    Bachelor of Arts graduates often combine their degree with a postgraduate qualification in, for example, teaching, journalism, librarianship, management, psychology or criminology, to prepare themselves for specialised employment.

    A Bachelor of Arts followed by CSU's graduate entry Bachelor of Teaching (Secondary) is a pathway to secondary teaching. Further study in the Bachelor of Teaching (Primary) is another option for students looking to become primary teachers.

    Less traditional combinations have also become common, for example, Bachelor of Arts graduates can now enter the accountancy profession through a postgraduate conversion course.

  • Subjects

    Art History

    The Art History major is designed to provide a thorough understanding of artworks, artists, and the role of art in society, in the past as well as the present. It introduces a range of theories about why art is produced and how it functions. Students develop their skills in looking at and analysing artworks, and in considering the social context of art and the biography and psychology of the artist. Practical studio skills or previous study in Art History are not essential.

    • Level 1 subjects give a general survey of international movements
    • Level 2 subjects offer a study of Australian art and its native and overseas influences
    • At Level 3, students specialise in periods and themes of particular interest

    The major recognises areas of arts practice beyond painting and sculpture. Consideration of other arts and mediums is integrated into the course, with specialised subjects in design, photography and electronic media. Questions about the role and function of the arts in today's society and issues of gender, class and ethnicity are canvassed.

    Art History is of relevance to students training to be practitioners in the arts and to those intending to be teachers, arts administrators, librarians, and gallery and museum officers, as well as having a strong non-vocational attraction for art-lovers. Students proceeding to Honours in Art History at CSU have the opportunity to undertake curatorial studies and internships.

    All subjects in the major are available on campus or distance education.

    Students are provided with extensive study guides and readings. In addition, they have access to specially developed picture resources on the internet, video and CD-ROM.

    Community Development and Human Services

    The community and human services sector provides the opportunity to apply a range of perspectives derived from the arts and humanities disciplines. In this major, subjects have been chosen to support a student wishing to develop critical knowledge about how communities work, politics and power relations, current social issues confronting communities and how human services not only contribute to strong, resilient and diverse communities but also support individuals and families to be able to contribute and prosper within their communities. Perspectives from sociology, politics, history and welfare all contribute to provide both a depth and breadth of knowledge within this major that is highly relevant to our contemporary world. Investigation and analysis of social issues relating to communities and human services offer graduates a strong foundation for working in administrative and policy areas within the community development and human services fields in either government or non-government organisations.

    English

    English as an academic discipline involves the study of literature in the English language. Although the reading of literature involves pleasure, it also demands rigour and critical intelligence. In particular, English develops attentiveness to the workings of language that is highly valued in many walks of life.

    First-year English subjects provide a broad history of the development of the literature of England until the 19th Century. Subsequently, attention moves to predominantly 19th and 20th Century literature, and to Ireland and to other parts of the world such as America and Australia, which produce literature in English. Subjects are also available on literary theory, children's literature, creative writing and literature and film.

    History

    We cannot understand current events, and our place in the world, without history. History's concern with the past is essential to questions of identity and national roles. We all use images of the past as a basis for judgment, even if we do so in an unthinking way. The chief role of the academic discipline of history is to ensure that those images are as accurate as possible, based on rigorous study rather than myth or prejudice. History teaching also emphasises the importance of skills such as information seeking, critical thinking, interpreting evidence, and writing coherently and persuasively.

    The study of history is essential to understanding the major conflicts and problems of our time. This is true of particular current controversies and of perennial questions. There are national controversies which are dependent upon an understanding of history, such as whether or not Australia should become a republic. International issues, such as why Australian troops have been involved in a series of foreign conflicts, from the Boer War in the 19th Century to the invasion of Iraq in the new millennium, cannot be resolved without historical enquiry. Whenever assessing economic or political arguments, one needs a grasp of 20th Century history. This is all the more urgent in our own time, when mythical and ideological claims are being made and often passed off as 'fact'. For instance, an historian is well able to explain why the border between East Timor and Australia has been undefined and disputed for decades, or why the golden-domed mosque in Jerusalem has become a symbol for competing nationalist claims in the Middle East. Without knowing the past, one cannot really understand these present issues. Historians are valued by the general community for their ability to look beyond the present, and cut away misconceptions.

    The study of past human activity ranges from history's more traditional forms, emphasising politics and conflict, to social, economic and cultural concerns. Family and gender relations, race and ethnicity, class relations, the natural and built environment, and the everyday lives of ordinary people are among the fields which now provide the focus for some of the most stimulating work done by historians. The History major, which concentrates on 20th Century history, reflects this variety through its strengths in political, cultural and social history, Australian history and international history. Your study in history begins with introductory subjects at first level, thematic studies at second level and specialised in-depth studies, which build on existing work at third level.

    Studying history will enhance employment prospects in a variety of fields. Particular areas of employment include administration, the media, teaching, research, librarianship, archival, museum and heritage positions. History provides skills relevant to future employment - skills in information seeking, critical thinking, assessing, interpreting and judging evidence and writing abilities highly sought in today's world of information and communication.

    Postgraduate diplomas in areas such as education, journalism, management, information management or curatorship add to the employability of history graduates. In addition, the history major can provide the basis for further study towards an Honours degree in history, and Master and Doctoral programs.

    Indigenous Studies

    The Indigenous Studies major and minor sequence of study offers students the exciting opportunity to build expertise and competency in the discipline of Indigenous Australian Studies. The major covers Indigenous Australia from a variety of standpoints: history, society, culture and experience. Indigenous Studies subjects have been established with the University’s innovative Centre for Indigenous Studies. Students from all other Arts majors will find subjects closely related to their main areas of disciplinary interest. Students are able to pursue a sustained pattern of study that will afford a profound engagement with the Indigenous histories and cultures of Australia. In first year, students are offered core studies in Indigenous Australian culture and society, before more specialised options ranging from literature to history in Indigenous Australian contexts.

    Philosophy

    Philosophy as an academic practice arises out of the attempt to answer questions that cannot be resolved simply by discovering more facts. Anyone who has ever asked themselves whether a loving God could allow suffering in the world, what the limits of loyalty to friends should be, or whether democracy is necessarily the best political system, has in fact been asking philosophical questions. Thus Philosophy arises from common questions and makes use of a standard way of approaching those questions. Over thousands of years of history Philosophy has developed a rich body of techniques and methods. In recent years philosophers have engaged with problems of 'applied ethics' such as business and professional morality, new technology, and rights of access to medical treatment. Philosophy emphasises clarity and economy of thought and expression, and especially the offering and evaluation of reasons in support of claims.

    The Philosophy major at Charles Sturt University gives students access to this rich body of philosophical method and discussion. It has an emphasis on ethics and social philosophy, enabling it to complement the professional disciplines taught within the School of Humanities and Social Sciences.

    Psychology

    The choice of Psychology as a major or minor is appealing to many students, due to its focus on human behaviour and thinking. A Psychology major offers a diversity of subject material, as psychologists have studied almost every aspect of human activity. Students learn psychology's methods of enquiry as well as its discoveries.

    The Bachelor of Arts with a Psychology major is NOT a pathway to accreditation at a Psychologist. For those students who wish to gain accreditation, students should enrol in the Bachelor of Psychology or the Bachelor of Social Science (Psychology), both of which are available on campus at Bathurst or Wagga Wagga, or by distance education.

    Policy Studies

    A major in policy studies at CSU offers selected subjects from different perspectives – politics, sociology, history and economics - that are critical to understanding policy development and contemporary policy issues within an Australian and international perspective. An ability to analyse, interpret and contribute to development of policy, along with strong critical and communication skills gives graduates with this major a sound foundation for employment within government departments, particularly those dealing with international relations and trade, and in the private sector. Policy development and analysis roles are also to be found within other government and non-government organisations.

    Politics

    The study of political science as a major or minor enables students to gain a sound grasp of the nature of political systems and their workings. The major in politics offers a balance between international patterns in politics such as international relations and local Australian government and history. Students also have the possibility of studying the interrelationship of politics and media representation, as well as how political systems interact with the justice system. In the course of studying politics, the nature of political representation, its history, and its different manifestations around the world will be studied. The Politics major is taught on campus at Bathurst, with distance education options available.

    Sociology

    Sociology is the science of society, studying ways in which societies operate by focusing on their constituent parts, their structure and process. Sociologists are interested in small social units, families, gangs, communes, sports teams and so on, and the connection between these and large institutions such as political, economic and legal systems. Sociologists aim to achieve as comprehensive and profound an understanding as possible of the whole structure of the society, its strengths, weaknesses and problems, and of the forces that cause social problems.

    In simple terms, sociologists are interested in people and the way they relate to others. In studying social life, sociologists seek to understand human behaviour, identify the factors which guide or direct social life and the causes of problems, and attempt to provide explanations for the ills of modern societies, also proposing ways of responding to these social issues and problems. As a consequence, those who study Sociology are expected to acquire insights into the nature of their social surroundings and will be able to reach an informed opinion on contemporary social issues.

    They will also acquire analytical and critical skills that will be of use in their personal growth and development as well as in many fields of employment.

    Subject levels
    • no more than 10 Level 1 subjects (80 points) may be counted towards the Bachelor of Arts degree
    • at least five subjects (40 points) must be taken at Level 3,
    • and some subjects require successful completion of other prerequisite subjects. These prerequisites may be determined from the subject descriptions in the Handbook.

    The below information is for new students. Current students should select their subjects by checking the Handbook for the year of their enrolment

    Course structure

    THE BACHELOR OF ARTS (192)
    The course is organised on the basis of a combination of Majors and Minors and a number of unrestricted electives.

    All students must complete EITHER two Majors OR one Major and two Minors, as follows:

    Option A: Two Majors

    • 2 x 8 subject Major (16) Selected from list A
    • 6 unrestricted electives (48) offered by CSU
    • 1 compulsory Indigenous subject.  Students can choose from IKC101, IKC102, IKC103, IKC200, IKC201, IKC202, IKC300, IKC302, IKC303*, THL225, THL328 or any other IKC subject offered.
    • 1 compulsory subject COM120
    • At least five subjects at Level 3 must be completed.

    Option B: One Major and two Minors

    • 1 x 8 subject Major selected from list A 
    • 1 x 4 subject minor selected from list B
    • 1 x 4 subject minor selected from list B
    • 6 unrestricted electives selected (48) offered by CSU
    • 1 compulsory Indigenous subject.  Students can choose from IKC101, IKC102, IKC103, IKC200, IKC201, IKC202, IKC300, IKC302, IKC303*, THL225, THL328 or any other IKC subject offered.
    • 1 compulsory subject COM120
    • At least five subjects at Level 3 must be completed.

    Majors and Minors are chosen from the following:

    List A 

    • Art History
    • Community Development and Human Services
    • English
    • History
    • Indigenous Studies
    • Philosophy
    • Politics
    • Policy Studies
    • Psychology
    • Sociology

    List B: Minors

    • Art History
    • Children's Literature
    • Community Development and Human Services
    • Economics
    • English
    • Ethics
    • History
    • Indigenous Studies
    • Justice Studies
    • Language and Culture
    • Mathmatics
    • Philosophy
    • Policy Studies
    • Politics
    • Psychology
    • Sociology
    • Theology
    • Writing 

     

    In selecting areas of study and subjects, the following rules apply:

    •  Each student will select two Majors, OR one Major and two Minors, in different areas. Majors from Lists A Minors from B
    •  In special circumstances the Course Coordinator may approve Minors in disciplines not listed above. Please note that List B Minors may contain subjects which also appear in Majors.
    • Unrestricted elective subjects may be selected from any area, subject to any other restrictions.
    • No more than fifteen subjects can be taken from any one Discipline area.
    • No more than six subjects may be taken from outside Lists A and B
    • No more than ten subjects at Level 1 may be counted towards the degree.
    • At least five subjects at Level 3 must be completed.
    • The generic skills subject COM120 is compulsory.
    • Students completing a major or minor in Indigenous Studies are exempted from completing a compulsory Indigenous Studies subject. A student completing a major or minor in Indigenous Studies is free to choose an additional elective. *

    Discipline restrictions

    • No more than fifteen subjects from a single discipline may be counted towards the Bachelor of Arts degree. A discipline is defined as follows:
    • Art History: all subjects with ART or VIS codes
    • English: all subjects with LIT or WRT codes, plus COM327
    • History: all subjects with HST codes, plus COM225 and COM226
    • Philosophy: all subjects with PHL codes plus POL205
    • Psychology: all subjects with PSY codes
    • Sociology: all subjects with SOC codes, plus ANT160, and COM219.

     

    MAJORS:

    Art History Major

    Level 1

    ART113 European Art 1850-1920: Origins of Modernity
    ART114 Modern Art - Twentieth Century 1920-1970

    Level 2

    At least two of the following:

    ART210 Australian Art to 1939
    ART215 Australian Art from 1939
    ART222 Art, Technology and Culture
    ART223 Australian Aboriginal Art

    Level 3

     At least two of the following:

    ART304 Aspects of Design
    ART318 The Body in Art
    ART310 Issues in Contemporary Art
    ART316 Italian Renaissance Art
    ART317 Art and Books
    ART318 Body in Art

    Note: some Level 3 subjects may be offered in rotation from year to year.

     

    Community Development and Human Services Major

    Level 1

    SOC108 Sociology of Health and Health Care

    Level 2

    At least two of the following:

    POL210 Politics of Identity
    SOC205 Social Research
    SOC 215 Gender, Family and Society
    WEL218 Developing Cross Cultural Competencies
    SOC 226 Rural Sociology

    Level 3

    And both:

    SOC 308 Community Analysis
    HST310 Drugs and Alcohol: Historical Perspectives

     

    English Major

    Level 1

    Two of the following:

    LIT107 English Literature 1
    LIT108 English Literatute 2
    LIT111 Texts and Meanings
    *LIT124 Children's Literature: the Oral Tradition

    At least two of the following

    Level 2

    LIT201 Irish Literature
    LIT212 American Literature
    LIT214 Australian Literature
    LIT216 Introduction to Literary Theory
    LIT218 The 'Woman Question' in Nineteenth-Century England and America
    LIT219 Drugs and Alcohol in Literature
    **LIT220 Screenwriting
    **LIT221 Creative Writing
    **WRT210 Writing for Publication
    *LIT224 Children's Literature: Fantasy and Realism

    Level 3

    At least two of the following

    COM327 Literature and Film
    LIT301 Modernism
    LIT302 Contemporary Australian Writing
    LIT303 The English Novel from Austen to Lawrence
    LIT315 Author in Context: Special Literary Study
    *LIT324 Australian Children's Literature
    *LIT325 Writing for Children and Teens
    **WRT301 Life Writing

    Note:
    *A student may include in their English major no more than two of LIT124 Children's Literature: the Oral Tradition, LIT224 Children's Literature: Fantasy and Realism, LIT324 Australian Children's Literature and LIT325 Writing for Children and Teens.
    ** A student may include in their English major no more than two of LIT220, LIT221, WRT210 and WRT301.

    History Major

    Level 1

    HST101 The Contemporary World 1
    HST102 The Contemporary World 2

    Level 2

    At least two of the following:

    HST201 Colonial Australia
    HST204 Twentieth Century Australia
    HST210 Media and Society in the Twentieth Century
    HST211 Gender, Sexuality and Identity in Europe from 1890
    HST212 Film and History
    HST213 Australian Civics and Citizenship
    HST214 Medieval World 

    Level 3

    At least two of the following:

    HST301 International History from 1945
    HST303 Literature and Society
    HST308 Australia and Asia
    HST310 Drugs and Alcohol: Historical Perspectives
    HST311 Philosophy of History

    Note: some Level 2 and Level 3 subjects may be offered in rotation from year to year.

    Indigenous Major

    Level 1

    IKC102 Indigenous Australian Cultures
    IKC103 Indigenous Australian Histories

    Level 2

    IKC200 Contemporary Indigenous Realities

    And at least one from the following:

    IKC201 Comparative Indigenous Studies
    IKC202 Indigenous Australians and Literature
    ART223 Australian Aboriginal Art
    COM217 Indigenous Peoples Portrayals and Representation
    THL225 Aboriginal Cultures and Spirituality

    Level 3

    IKC300 Politics of Race and Representation

    And at least two from the following:

    IKC302 Human Rights and Indigenous Australians
    IKC303 Indigenous Australians and the Politics of Control
    THL328 Reconciliation: the theological/political nexus in Indigenous public policy

     

    Philosophy Major

    Level 1

    PHL101 Applied Ethics
    PHL103 Theories of Human Nature

    Level 2

    At least two of the following:

    PHL201 Critical Reasoning
    PHL202 Ethical Theory
    POL205 Political Ideas
    PHL206 Problems of Philosophy
    PHL209 Theories of Justice

    Level 3

    At least two of the following:

    PHL301 Philosophy of Religion
    PHL302 Values and Decisions
    PHL304 Philosophy of Science
    PHL305 The Self

     

    Politics Major

    Level 1

    POL111 International Relations*
    POL110 Australian History and Politics

    Level 2

    At least two of the following:

    POL205 Political Ideas
    POL210 Politics of Identity
    HST211 Gender, Sexuality and Identity in Europe from 1890
    HST213 Australian Civics and Citizenship
    POL213 Australian Government and Politics**

    Level 3

    At least two of the following:

    POL305 Politics and the Media
    HST301 International History from 1945
    HST308 Australia and Asia
    THL328 Reconciliation: The Theological/Political Nexus in Indigenous Public Policy
    IKC300 Indigenous Australians and the Politics of Race and Representation
    IKC303 Indigenous Australians and the Politics of Control

    Note:
    *POL111 replaces POL212 and students who have done POL212 cannot do POL111
    **POL213 replaces POL101, and students who have done POL101 cannot do POL213

     

    Policy Studies Major

    Level 1

    POL110 Australian History and Politics
    POL111 International Relations

    Level 2

    SOC218 Policy, Power and Social Action
    SOC219 Policy Research
    HST213 Australian Civics and Citizenship
    SPE211 Foundations in Social Policy

    Level 3

    SOC308 Community Analysis
    and either
    HST308 Australia and Asia
    or
    ECO320 International Economics

     

    Psychology Major (Non-Accredited)

    An eight-subject Psychology major, not accredited by the APAC, is chosen in the following 
way:

    Level 1

    either
    PSY101 Foundations of Psychology 1
    and
    PSY102 Foundations of Psychology 2
    or
    PSY111 Foundations of Psychology for Health and Human Services,
    and
    PSY113 Child and Adolescent Psychology

    Level 2

    PSY201 Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology

    And two from the following:

    PSY202 Developmental Psychology
    PSY203 Social Psychology
    PSY204 Psychological Testing
    PSY208 Biopsychology

     

    Level 3

    At least two of the following:

    PSY301 Advanced Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology#
    PSY303Language and Subjectivity
    PSY304 Psychopathology
    PSY305 Psychology of Personality
    PSY307 Cognition
    PSY308 Psychology of Learning#
    PSY309 Qualitative Research Methods#
    PSY316 Psychology of Stress and Trauma

    # Students studying by DE must attend a compulsory residential school for this subject.

     

    Sociology Major

    Level 1

    SOC101 Introductory Sociology
    SOC102 Social Inequality

    Level 2

    SOC205 Social Research

    And at least one from the following:

    SOC203 Sociology of Youth
    SOC215 Gender, Family and Society
    SOC212 Class: Images and Reality
    SOC220 Living in a Global World
    SOC226 Rural Sociology

    Level 3

    SOC303 Sociological Theory

    And at least one from the following:

    SOC302 Environment and Society
    SOC308 Community Analysis
    SOC314 Organisations, Culture and Society
    SOC316 Animals and Society

     

    Minors

    Art History Minor

    ART113 European Art 1850-1920: Origins of Modernity
    ART114 Modern Art - Twentieth Century 1920-1970

    And any two of the following:

    ART210 Australian Art to 1939
    ART215 Australian Art from 1939
    ART222 Art, Technology and Culture
    ART223 Australian Aboriginal Art
    ART310 Issues in Contemporary Art
    ART316 Italian Renaissance Art
    ART317 Art and Books

    Note: some Level 3 subjects may be offered in rotation from year to year.

     

    Children's Literature Minor

    LIT124 Children's Literature: the Oral Tradition
    LIT224 Children's Literature: Fantasy and Realism
    LIT324 Australian Children's Literature
    LIT325 Writing for Children and Teens


    Community Development and Human Services Minor

    HCS111 Introduction to Social Welfare
    and
    SOC102 Social Inequality
    or
    PSY111 Foundations of Psychology for Health and Human Services

    Any two from the following:

    POL210 Politics of Identity
    SOC205 Social Research
    SOC 215 Gender, Family and Society
    WEL218 Developing Cross Cultural Competencies
    SOC 226 Rurality in a Globalised World
    SOC 308 Community Analysis
    HST310 Drugs and Alcohol: Historical Perspectives

     

    Economics Minor

    ECO130 Business Economics

    And three of the following

    ECO210 Labour Economics
    ECO215 Managerial Economics for Business Strategy
    ECO220 Macroeconomic Analysis
    ECO240 Forecasting for Business
    ECO320 International Economics
    ECO355 Contemporary Economic Issues

     

    English Minor

    Fours Subjects chosen as follows:

    Two of the following:

    LIT107 English Literature 1
    LIT108 English Literatute 2
    LIT111 Texts and Meanings
    *LIT124 Children's Literature: the Oral Tradition (First offered Session 1 2014)

    And any two of the following, with at least one at Level 2:

    LIT201 Irish Literature
    LIT212 American Literature
    LIT214 Australian Literature
    LIT216 Introduction to Literary Theory
    LIT218 The 'Woman Question' in Nineteenth-Century England and America
    LIT219 Drugs and Alcohol in Literature
    LIT220 Screenwriting
    LIT221 Creative Writing
    WRT210 Writing for Publication
    *LIT224 Children's Literature: Fantasy and Realism
    COM327 Literature and Film
    LIT301 Modernism
    LIT302 Contemporary Australian Writing
    LIT303 The English Novel from Austen to Lawrence
    LIT315 Author in Context: Special Literary Study 
    *LIT324 Australian Children's Literature
    *LIT325 Writing for Children and Teens
    WRT301 Life Writing

    Note:
    “*A student may include in their English minor no more than two of LIT124 Children’s Literature: the Oral Tradition, LIT224 Children’s Literature: Fantasy and Realism, LIT324 Australian Children’s Literature and LIT325 Writing for Children and Teens

     

    Ethics Minor

    PHL101 Applied Ethics
    PHL202 Ethical Theory

    And any two of the following:

    PHL103 Theories of Human Nature
    PHL209 Theories of Justice
    PHL302 Values and Decisions
    POL205 Political Ideas

     

    History Minor

    HST101 The Contemporary World 1
    HST102 The Contemporary World 2

    And any two of the following, with at least one at Level 2:

    HST201 Colonial Australia
    HST204 Twentieth Century Australia
    HST210 Media and Society in the Twentieth Century
    HST211 Gender, Sexuality and Identity in Europe from 1890
    HST212 Film and History
    HST213 Australian Civics and Citizenship
    HST214 Medieval World
    HST301 International History from 1945
    HST303 Literature and Society
    HST308 Australia and Asia
    HST310 Drugs and Alcohol: Historical Perspectives
    HST311 Local History in Context


    Indigenous Minor

    IKC102 Indigenous Australian Cultures
    IKC103 Indigenous Australian Histories

    And

    IKC200 Contemporary Indigenous Realities

    And one of the following subjects:

    IKC201 Comparative Indigenous Studies
    IKC202 Indigenous Australians and Literature
    COM217 Indigenous Peoples Portrayals and Representation
    ART223 Australian Aboriginal Art
    IKC300 Politics of Race and Representation
    IKC302 Human Rights and Indigenous Australians
    IKC303 Indigenous Australians and the Politics of Control
    THL 225 Aboringinal Cultures and Spirituality
    THL328 Reconciliation: the theological/political nexus in Indigenous public policy

     

    Justice Studies Minor

    JST104 Foundations in Criminology*
    JST205 Criminology
    PHL209 Theories of Justice
    *DE Study Only

    And one of the following:

    PSY211 Psychology of Crime
    JST201 Criminal Law and Process
    JST203 Punishment and the State
    JST204 Crime, Delinquency and Social Welfare
    JST222 Policing and Society
    JST302 Criminological Perspectives on Social Problems
    JST318 Human Rights and Social Justice
    JST320 Drugs, Crime and Society
    JST321 Government, Civil Society and Justice

     

    Mathematics Minor

    MTH101 Computer Aided Mathematics 1 with Applications
    MTH102 Computer Aided Mathematics 2 with Applications

    And any two from the following:

    MTH203 Numerical Methods
    MTH218 Multivariable Calculus
    MTH219 Linear Algebra
    MTH220 Ordinary Differential Equations
     

    Philosophy Minor

    PHL101 Applied Ethics

    And any three of the following, with at least one at level 2:

    PHL103 Theories of Human Nature
    PHL201 Critical reasoning
    PHL202 Ethical Theory
    POL 205 Political ideas
    PHL206 Problems of Philosophy
    PHL209 Theories of Justice
    PHL301 Philosophy of Religion
    PHL302 Values and Decisions
    PHL304 Philosophy of Science
    PHL305 The Self

     

    Politics Minor

    Two of the following:

    POL111 International Relations*
    POL106 Government and Police
    POL110 Australian History and Politics

    And any two of the following, with at least one at Level 2:

    POL205 Political Ideas
    POL210 Politics of Identity
    HST211 Gender, Sexuality and Identity in Europe from 1890
    HST213 Australian Civics and Citizenship
    POL213 Australian Government and Politics**
    POL305 Politics and the Media
    HST301 International History from 1945
    HST308 Australia and Asia
    THL328 Reconciliation: The Theological/Political Nexus in Indigenous Public Policy
    IKC300 Indigenous Australians and the Politics of Race and Representation
    IKC303 Indigenous Australians and Politics of Control

    Note:
    *POL111 replaces POL212, and students who have done POL212 cannot do POL111.
    **POL213 replaces POL101, and students who have done POL101 cannot do POL213.

     

    Policy Studies Minor

    POL110 Australian History and Politics
    SPE211 Foundations in Social Policy

    And any  of the following with at least one at Level 2:

    SOC218 Policy, Power and Social Action
    SOC219 Policy Research
    HST213 Australian Civics and Citizenship
    POL213 Australian Government and Politics
    HST308 Australia and Asia
    SOC308 Community Analysis

     

    Psychology Minor

    Students must complete two subjects at Level 1, being either PSY101 and PSY102 as a pair; or PSY111 and PSY113 as a pair:

    PSY101 Foundations of Psychology 1
    and
    PSY102 Foundations of Psychology 2
    or
    PSY111 Foundations of Psychology for Health and Human Services
    and
    PSY113 Child and Adolescent Psychology Foundations of Psychology

    And two other subjects selected from Level 2 and Level 3 PSY subjects for which the pre-requisites have been met, with at least one of these subjects being at Level 2.

     

    Sociology Minor

    SOC101 Introductory Sociologyor
    SOC108 Sociology of Healthand
    SOC102 Social Inequality

    And two from the following, with at least one at Level 2

    SOC203 Sociology of Youth
    SOC205 Social Research
    SOC215 Gender, Family and Society
    SOC220 Living in a Global World
    SOC226 Ruralityin a Globalised World
    SOC303 Sociological Theory
    SOC302 Environment and Society
    SOC308 Community Analysis
    SOC314 Organisations, Culture and Society
    SOC316 Sociology of Animals

     

    Theology Minor

    Two subjects from:

    THL105 Introduction to Old Testament Studies
    THL106 Introduction to New Testament Studies
    THL111 Introduction to Christian Theology
    THL113 Being the Church

    And two of the following, with at least one at Level 2:

    THL208 Synoptic Gospels
    THL211 Creation and Ecology
    THL225 Aboriginal Cultures and Spirituality
    THL231 Christianity in Australian History
    THL242 New Religious Movements, Cults and Sects
    THL245 God, Humanity and Difference
    PHL301 Philosophy of Religion
    THL322 Theology, Arts and Film
    THL326 Theological Ethics
    THL329 World Religions
    THL334 Interfaith Dialogue

     

    Writing Minor

    Any four of the following:

    LIT220 Screenwriting
    LIT221 Creative Writing
    WRT210 Writing for Publication
    WRT301 Life Writing
    LIT325 Writing for Children and Teens

     

    Language and Culture Minor

    Students may do an International Exchange Program as part of their Bachelor of Arts. This program counts as a minor in the degree and is equivalent to 32 credit points. The minor, or part thereof, is achieved by a student successfully completing studies in an approved program at a CSU Exchange Partner University.

    International Exchange

    HSS308 International Exchange is worth 8 subject credit points. This subject is provided in recognition of students' full and compliant participation in an International Short Term Program. Programs will comprise 120-140 hours learning in a cultural and educational program in an international setting involving students engaging in studies of culture, language, history, art, etc. with visits to sites of cultural and educational significance, and intercultural engagement with local people. These activities may take place within the context of a professional work placement. However, workplace placements, in this subject, do not contribute to professional accreditation hours. The Social Work Exchange program does not qualify for this subject.

    Notes:

    In special circumstances the Course Coordinator may approve Minors in disciplines not listed above. Please note that Minors may contain subjects which also appear in Majors.
    Unrestructed elective subjects may be selected from any area, subject to any other restrictions.

    • No more than fifteen subjects can be taken from any one Discipline area.
    • No more than six subjects may be taken from outside Lists A and B
    • No more than ten subjects at Level 1 may be counted towards the degree.
    •  At least five subjects at Level 3 must be completed.
    • The generic skills subject COM120 is compulsory.
    Enrolment pattern

    Because of the flexibility of the course requirements, there is no prescribed enrolment pattern. Students may choose the order in which they undertake subjects, depending upon the availability of subjects and the requirements for their majors and minors. It is expected that students will complete Level 1 subjects before progressing to Level 2 subjects, and Level 2 subjects before progressing to Level 3 subjects for each of their majors and minors.

  • Residential schools

    The following subjects may have a residential school component:

    THL105 Introduction To Old Testament Studies
    THL111 Introduction To Christian Theology
    THL242 New Religious Movements, Cults and Sects
    THL113 Being The Church
    HSS305 International Exchange
    PSY303 Language and Subjectivity
    THL208 The Synoptic Gospels
    PSY309 Qualitative Research Methods
    THL106 Introduction To New Testament Studies
    PSY301 Advanced Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology
    THL322 Theology, The Arts And Film
    THL334 Interfaith Dialogue

  • Admission information
    Indicative ATAR

    6500

    Admission is according to the standard CSU and UAC criteria for undergraduate courses.

    See standard CSU admission criteria

  • Cost of study

    Fees are relevant for 2016 only and are subject to change in future years. Tuition fees quoted do not include the Student Services and Amenities Fee.

    In some instances a tax deduction may be claimed for self education expenses. Please seek independent qualified taxation advice.

    Tuition costs
    Commonwealth supported place

    You will make a student contribution (formerly HECS) towards the cost of your tuition fees. Commonwealth supported places may be limited for this course.

    Options:

    1. Defer your payment using a HECS-HELP loan, which is repaid through the taxation system once your income reaches a certain threshold
    2. Pay your student contribution fee up-front each session
    6240*Student contribution fee for your first year of study

    * This is an estimated fee for your first year of study based on a full-time study load (eight 8 point subjects). Should you be studying less than eight subjects in your first year, the fees would be decreased proportionally. This figure excludes the Student Services and Amenities fee. If your entire course is less than the equivalent of one year of full-time study, then the figure displayed is calculated as a percentage of a full-time study load e.g. 50%.

    More about Commonwealth supported places

    On campus (onshore) study mode
    2200*Tuition fee per 8 point subject
    Distance education (offshore) study mode
    2200*Tuition fee per 8 point subject

    * Fee for students commencing study in 2016.

    More information about international student fees

  • Course details
    Enrol TypeModeCampusFee typeSession1Session2Session3Admission Code
    DirectDistance EducationWagga WaggaCGSYYNEALQ
    DirectOn CampusBathurstCGSYYNKALB
    DirectOn CampusWagga WaggaFPOSYYNIALQ
    UACOn CampusWagga WaggaCGSYYN211004
    DirectOn CampusBathurstFPOSYYNIASQ
    DirectOn CampusWagga WaggaCGSYYNKAL
    UACOn CampusBathurstCGSYYN211007
    DirectDistance EducationWagga WaggaFPOSYYNJABA

    LEGEND
    CGS: Commonwealth Government supported places
    FPPG: Fee-paying postgraduate places
    FPOS: Fee-paying overseas student places
    Admission Code: For your reference if required during your application process
    NO TAC: An admission code is not required for applications to CSU Study Centres
    TEMP: An admission code has not yet been assigned for this course

    Graduation requirements

    To graduate, students must satisfactorily complete 192 points (normally equivalent to 24 subjects), no more than 64 points of which may have been taken outside the Faculty of Arts.

  • How to apply
    Apply through UAC

    Apply through the Universities Admissions Centre (UAC) if you are a school leaver wanting to study on campus.

    Apply through UAC

    Apply direct to CSU

    An online application to CSU takes about 15 minutes to complete. Find out more

    Apply online

    Apply direct to CSU

    Apply direct to CSU for on campus study at a CSU regional campus, or study by distance education.

    Apply online

    Recruitment agent

    Contact a Recruitment agent in your country who can answer your questions about CSU as well as help with the student visa application process.

    International recruitment agents

    CRICOS Code(s)

    000649C (Wagga Wagga, Bathurst)

    Thinking of deferring?

    Find out more about deferral

  • About the School
    School of Humanities and Social Sciences

    CSU’s School of Humanities and Social Sciences provides a supportive environment that builds authentic relationships, promotes critical thinking and encourages students to achieve their full potential. The School has more than 60 academic staff with specialisations in areas such as English, history, human services, justice studies, philosophy, politics, social work and sociology. Based on the Albury-Wodonga, Bathurst, Dubbo and Wagga Wagga campuses, the School offers a diverse environment, producing high quality research that makes a significant contribution to policy and practice.

  • Academic expectations

    For each 8 point subject at CSU, students should normally expect to spend between 140-160 hours engaged in the specified learning and assessment activities (such as attending lectures or residential schools, assigned readings, tutorial assistance, individual or group research/study, forum activity, workplace learning, assignments or examinations). The student workload for some subjects may vary from these norms as a result of approved course design.

    Students will be assessed on the basis of completed assignments, examinations, workplace learning, or other methods as outlined in specific subject outlines.

    Where applicable, students are responsible for travel and accommodation costs involved in workplace learning experiences, or attending residential schools (distance education students).

    Expectations relating to academic, workplace learning, time and cost requirements for specific subjects are provided in the subject abstracts and in course materials.

    Throughout their studies, CSU students have a responsibility to continue to develop skills in English Language, literacy and numeracy as appropriate to their discipline. This ongoing development will enable students to effectively participate in their course and graduate as competent professionals.

Make an enquiry

Call us on 1800 334 733,
(International +61 2 6338 6077)

Speak to a future student advisor

FREE CALL

Chat to us online

ONLINE CHAT

Enquire Online


Apply for admission

DOMESTIC
INTERNATIONAL