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Bachelor of Criminal Justice

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Bachelor of Criminal Justice

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Criminal justice is at the forefront of how a society is shaped and functions.

Described as the ways in which social control, deterring and mitigating crime and rehabilitation are developed and delivered in a society, criminal justice offers a range of diverse and exciting careers.

CSU’s Bachelor of Criminal Justice equips you with the skills and knowledge to progress to the Associate Degree in Policing Practice (ADPP) and to be further considered for entry into the NSW Police Force, subject to professional suitability.

It prepares you to work in diverse criminal justice fields, such as corrections, probation and parole, or work with refugees, criminal offenders, victims and their families.

Alternatively, during your work placement experience, you may discover other careers in law enforcement and social justice. There is also the possibility of entering an academic career after the Bachelor of Criminal Justice, embarking upon law studies or undertaking a higher degree by research.

  • Why study this course?

    Reasons to study Criminal Justice at CSU:

    • this is a multidisciplinary degree: students study a range of subjects, including justice studies, criminology, sociology, psychology, philosophy, communication and Indigenous studies. This means you can explore different career paths and stitch subjects together that suit your career plans or current workplace
    • the course is offered online and on campus at Bathurst and Port Macquarie, allowing you to study as flexibly as you need to
    • for those interested in a career in policing, the course offers a recognised pathway to apply for the NSW Police Force via the ADPP, subject to professional suitability and the availability of positions, which are determined based on the operational needs of the NSW Police Force
    • prepare yourself for other social justice challenges, including refugee incarceration, and community justice and crime prevention programs in Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities.
    How will I enter NSW Police?
    At the end of the first year of study, students can, if they choose, begin the process of applying to NSW Police. This includes completion of the University Certificate in Workforce Essentials and further information can be found at the NSW Police Recruitment site. If selected, you may enter the Goulburn Police Academy.  

    With credit available for study at the Goulburn Police Academy, students may secure both the ADPP qualification and the Bachelor of Criminal Justice degree within three years.

    Although the course offers a recognised pathway for students to apply to the NSW Police Force via the ADPP subject to professional suitability, there is no guarantee a graduate will be offered a place or employment with the NSW Police Force.

    What will I learn?
    CSU’s graduates possess a strong theoretical background and highly developed critical and analytical skills in diverse disciplines. Graduates understand the importance of reflexivity and the application of ethics to enable them to practise good citizenship and apply this to professional practice. Students will graduate with Indigenous cultural competence.

  • Career opportunities

    Career opportunities are found in areas such as:

    • policing
    • criminal and social justice research and policy
    • corrections, probation and parole
    • associated work with offenders and families
    • community and welfare organisations
    • juvenile justice
    • other criminal justice and social justice occupations.

  • Workplace learning

    In their final year, students will undertake an 80 to 90 hour work placement with a criminal justice organisation. This workplace learning opportunity enables students to develop insight into their chosen profession and foster professional relationships and is a chance to apply their learning.

    This placement is geared towards making graduates work ready upon completion of their course.

    Please note that the following subjects have a Workplace Learning component:

    JST321 Justice Studies Workplace Learning

  • Subjects

    The below information is for new students. Current students should select their subjects by checking the Handbook for the year of their enrolment

    Course structure

    The course consists of a total of 192 points as follows:

    Core subjects (136 points, 17 subjects)

    Elective subjects (56 points, 7 subjects of which 40 points (5 subjects) are to be taken from the list of electives. The electives have been grouped into areas. Students may chose to take five subjects from a particular area or any five subjects from the list.

    A further 16 points (2 subjects) may be taken from any CSU undergraduate university subject for which the student has adequate assumed knowledge).

    Core Subjects


    JST110 Introduction to the Australian Legal System
    COM120 Reasoning and Writing
    SOC101 Introductory Sociology
    JST123 Indigenous Australians and Justice
    PSY111 Foundations of Psychology
    JST203 Punishment and the State
    JST204 Young People and Crime
    JST205 Criminology: History and Theory
    JST201 Criminal Law and Process
    JST228 Police and the Community
    SOC205 Social Research
    JST220 Gender and Crime
    JST318 Human Rights and Social Justice
    JST320 Drugs, Crime and Society
    JST309 Indigenous Issues in Policing
    JST337 Crimes of the Powerful
    JST321 Justice Studies Workplace Learning

    Electives Elective  grouping is provided to guide students who wish to focus their electives in a particular area.

    Justice Studies
    JST226 Introduction to Police Investigations
    JST313 Investigative Interviewing
    JST319 Evidence Law and Procedure
    JST338 Crime, Media, and Culture
    JST339 Sentencing Law and Practice
    SPE211 Foundations in Social Policy

    Welfare
    HCS103 Fields of Practice
    HCS205 Child Abuse and Protection
    HCS310 Mental Health and Mental Disorder
    HCS321 Welfare Practice with Children, Young People and their Carers
    LAW221 Law for Human Services
    WEL217 Social Dimensions of Disability
    WEL218 Developing Cross-cultural Competencies
    WEL229 Drugs, Alcohol and Gambling

    History and Politics
    HST211 Gender, Sexuality and Identity in Europe from 1890
    HST213 Australian Civics and Citizenship
    PHL209 Theories of Justice
    POL205 Political Ideas
    POL210 Politics of Identity
    POL213 Australian Government and Politics
    POL303 Organised Crime
    POL305 Politics and the Media

    Psychology (Core - PSY101 Prerequisite)
    PSY102 Foundations of Psychology
    PSY201 Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology (assumed knowledge)
    PSY202 Developmental Psychology (assumed knowledge)
    PSY203 Social Psychology (assumed knowledge)
    PSY304 Psychopathology (assumed knowledge)
    PSY305 Psychology of Personality (assumed knowledge)
     

    Psychology (Applied - PSY111 prerequisite)
    PSY113 Child and Adolescent Psychology
    PSY211 Psychology of Crime
    PSY214 Health Psychology
    PSY216 Psychology of Aging
    PSY218 Psychology of Substance Abuse
    PSY313 Psychology and the Legal System
    PSY316 Psychology of Stress and Trauma

    Sociology
    SOC102 Social Inequality
    SOC203 Sociology of Youth
    SOC212 Class: Images and Reality
    SOC215 Gender, Family and Society
    SOC308 Community Analysis
    SOC314 Organisations, Culture and Society

    Enrolment pattern

    Year 1 Session 1 (30)
    JST110 Introduction to the Australian Legal System
    JST123 Indigenous Australians and Justice
    SOC101 Introductory Sociology
    COM120 Reasoning and Writing

    Year 1 Session 2 (60)
    PSY111 Foundations of Psychology (or PSY101 for students wanting to take electives from the Psychology Core specialisation)
    JST203 Punishment and the State
    JST204 Young People and Crime
    JST205 Criminology: History and Theory

    Year 2 Session 1 (30)
    JST320 Drugs, Crime and Society
    JST201 Criminal Law and Process
    SOC205 Social Research
    Restricted Elective

    Year 2 Session 2 (60)
    JST228 Police and the Community
    JST220 Gender and Crime
    JST309 Indigenous Issues in Policing
    JST318 Human Rights and Social Justice

    Year 3 Session 1 (30)
    JST337 Crimes of the Powerful
    Restricted Elective
    Restricted Elective
    Open Elective

    Year 3 Session 2 (60)
    JST321 Justice Studies Workplace Learning
    Restricted Elective
    Restricted Elective
    Open Elective

    Part Time
    Year 1 Session 1 (30)
    JST110 Introduction to the Australian Legal System
    COM120 Reasoning and Writing

    Year 1 Session 2 (60)
    PSY111 Foundations of Psychology
    JST205 Criminology: History and Theory

    Year 2 Session 1 (30)
    JST123 Indigenous Australians and Justice
    SOC101 Introductory Sociology

    Year 2 Session 2 (60)
    JST203 Punishment and the State
    JST204 Young People and Crime

    Year 3 Session 1 (30)
    JST320 Drugs, Crime and Society
    SOC205 Social Research

    Year 3 Session 2 (60)
    JST220 Gender and Crime
    JST309 Indigenous Issues in Policing

    Year 4 Session 1 (30)
    JST201 Criminal Law and Process
    Restricted Elective

    Year 4 Session 2 (60)
    JST318 Human Rights and Social Justice
    JST228 Police and the Community
     

    Year 5 Session 1 (30)
    JST337 Crimes of the Powerful
    Restricted Elective

    Year 5 Session 2 (60)
    Restricted Elective
    Restricted Elective

    Year 6 Session 1 (30)
    Restricted Elective
    Open Elective

    Year 6 Session 2 (60)
    JST321 Justice Studies Workplace Learning
    Open Elective

  • Residential schools

    The following subject may have a residential school component:

    JST313 Investigative Interviewing

  • Admission information
    Indicative ATAR

    6500

    Standard UAC admission criteria apply for this degree. HSC subjects are not assumed knowledge. There are no professional or other employment requirements.

    Prospective students from regional areas may be guaranteed an offer for fulltime internal study prior to the release of their ATAR by participating in the Schools Recommendation Scheme (SRS). The region served by CSU for the application of the SRS scheme is defined as the northern half of Victoria, the ACT and most of regional NSW, apart from the Sydney, Newcastle and Wollongong areas.

    See standard CSU admission criteria

  • Cost of study

    Fees - please visit the fees and costs page or contact us for current fee information.

    Tax deduction - in some instances a tax deduction may be claimed for self education expenses. Please seek independent qualified taxation advice.

  • Course details

    Campus locations listed for Distance Education students are purely for administrative purposes and have no relevance to the student experience.


    Enrol TypeModeCampusFee typeSession1Session2Session3Admission Code
    DirectOn CampusBathurstCGSYYNKARB
    UACOn CampusPort MacquarieCGSYYN211890
    DirectOn CampusPort MacquarieCGSYYNKARJ
    DirectOn CampusPort MacquarieFPOSYYNIAPJ
    DirectDistance EducationBathurstFPOSYYNJAQR
    DirectOn CampusBathurstFPOSYNNIAQR
    DirectDistance EducationBathurstCGSYYNEAQR
    UACOn CampusBathurstCGSYYN211897

    LEGEND
    CGS: Commonwealth Government supported places
    FPPG: Fee-paying postgraduate places
    FPOS: Fee-paying overseas student places
    Admission Code: For your reference if required during your application process
    NO TAC: An admission code is not required for applications to CSU Study Centres
    TEMP: An admission code has not yet been assigned for this course

    Graduation requirements

    The number of subjects and specific subject choices are described in the Course Structure and Enrolment Pattern for the course.

  • How to apply
    Apply through UAC

    Apply through the Universities Admissions Centre (UAC) if you are a school leaver wanting to study on campus.

    Apply through UAC

    Apply direct to CSU

    An online application to CSU takes about 15 minutes to complete. Find out more

    Apply online

    Apply direct to CSU

    Apply direct to CSU for on campus study at a CSU regional campus, or study by distance education.

    Apply online

    Recruitment agent

    Contact a Recruitment agent in your country who can answer your questions about CSU as well as help with the student visa application process.

    International recruitment agents

    CRICOS Code(s)

    022895G (Port Macquarie, Bathurst)

    Thinking of deferring?

    Find out more about deferral

  • About the School
    School of Humanities and Social Sciences

    CSU’s School of Humanities and Social Sciences provides a supportive environment that builds authentic relationships, promotes critical thinking and encourages students to achieve their full potential. The School has more than 60 academic staff with specialisations in areas such as English, history, human services, justice studies, philosophy, politics, social work and sociology. Based on the Albury-Wodonga, Bathurst, Dubbo and Wagga Wagga campuses, the School offers a diverse environment, producing high quality research that makes a significant contribution to policy and practice.

  • Academic expectations

    For each 8 point subject at CSU, students should normally expect to spend between 140-160 hours engaged in the specified learning and assessment activities (such as attending lectures or residential schools, assigned readings, tutorial assistance, individual or group research/study, forum activity, workplace learning, assignments or examinations). The student workload for some subjects may vary from these norms as a result of approved course design.

    Students will be assessed on the basis of completed assignments, examinations, workplace learning, or other methods as outlined in specific subject outlines.

    Where applicable, students are responsible for travel and accommodation costs involved in workplace learning experiences, or attending residential schools (distance education students).

    Expectations relating to academic, workplace learning, time and cost requirements for specific subjects are provided in the subject abstracts and in course materials.

    Throughout their studies, CSU students have a responsibility to continue to develop skills in English Language, literacy and numeracy as appropriate to their discipline. This ongoing development will enable students to effectively participate in their course and graduate as competent professionals.

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