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Bachelor of Social Science (Gerontology and Healthy Ageing)

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Bachelor of Social Science (Gerontology and Healthy Ageing)

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CSU’s Bachelor of Social Science (Gerontology and Healthy Ageing) has a healthy ageing, welfare focus and prepares students for rewarding careers in aged care. The expansion in the number of older people with the baby boomer generation reaching more senior years will expand the need for workers in this field.

  • Why study this course?

    Gerontology is the study of the ageing processes and individuals as they grow from middle-age through later life. It includes:

    • the study of physical, mental and social changes in older people as they age
    • the investigation of the changes in society resulting from our ageing population
    • the application of this knowledge to policies and programs.

    CSU’s Bachelor of Social Science (Gerontology and Healthy Ageing) is an articulated program that prepares students for careers in aged care. It is designed for students who have an existing TAFE Diploma in a related area and are interested in changing careers, or those who work in the industry but wish to upgrade their formal qualification from a TAFE diploma to a degree to enhance their career opportunities.

    This program offers students an education in ageing as a life stage, examining the challenges and issues of ageing within the context of a social model of health, human rights as well as individual and community development.

    Graduates of this course are committed to advancing social justice, human rights and thriving communities through education, research, ethical practice and partnerships.

  • Career opportunities

    This degree provides an area of specialisation for those working with older people in the social welfare field. Graduates will be equipped with the skills and knowledge required to work directly with the elderly or in related fields such as policy development. There are employment opportunities working at the interface between people and their environments in a range of settings from hospitals to local councils, social welfare agencies, or within their own businesses. 

    Graduates will have opportunities to develop and extend their thinking in areas related to life stage, direct care, health promotion, service management, advocacy, mental health and dementia care, social research and policy making.

    Career opportunities include:

    • aged care policy development
    • professional practice in health and human services with older people
    • leadership positions in aged care services
    • health promotion and community development
    • social research.
  • Credit and pathways

    Credit for prior learning and credit for current competencies will be granted to eligible applicants.

    More about Credit

    Students who have successfully completed one of the following two-year Diploma courses (or similar) will be eligible for  96 points or 1.5 years full-time equivalent credit (Recognition of Prior Learning) towards the Bachelor of Social Science (Gerontology and Healthy Ageing):

    • Diploma of Community Services (Alcohol and Other Drugs)
    • Diploma of Community Services (Alcohol and Other Drugs and Mental Health)
    • Diploma of Community Services (Case Management)
    • Diploma of Community Services (Financial Counselling)
    • Diploma of Community Services (Mental Health)
    • Diploma of Community Services Work
    • Diploma of Community Development
    • Diploma of Counselling
    • Diploma of Disability
    • Diploma of Leisure and Health 
    • Diploma of Nursing

    Note: Some Diploma courses are not 2 years full-time equivalent – please check with the Course Director as to acceptability.

  • Subjects

    The below information is for new students. Current students should select their subjects by checking the Handbook for the year of their enrolment

    Course structure

    The Bachelor of Social Science (Gerontology and Healthy Ageing) course consists of subjects in the following areas comprising:

    HCS102 Communication and Human Services
    PHL101 Applied Ethics
    SOC101 Introduction to Sociology
    IKC101 Indigenous Cultures, Histories and Contemporary Realities
    SPE211 Foundations in Social Policy
    HSS300 Professional Development

    Plus the following specialisaton subjects:

    GER102 Gerontology Theory and Research
    GER204 Ageing and Professional Practice
    WEL206 Facilitating Positive behaviours
    WEL409 Grief and Loss
    PSY216 Psychology of Ageing (Common to existing Social Welfare Strand as a restricted elective choice)
    WEL418 Case Management (Common to existing Social Welfare Strand)

    Enrolment pattern
    Gerontology and Healthy Ageing

    Part time Distance Education

    SESSION 1 INTAKE

    Year 1 - Session 1
    HCS102 Communication and Human Services
    PHL101 Applied Ethics

    Year 1 - Session 2
    GER102 Gerontology Theory and Research
    SOC101 Introduction to Sociology

    Year 2 - Session 1
    WEL206 Facilitating Positive Behaviours
    IKC101 Indigenous Cultures, Histories and Contemporary Realities

    Year 2 - Session 2
    SPE211 Foundations in Social Policy
    PSY216 Psychology of Ageing

    Year 3 - Session 1
    GER204 Ageing and Professional Practice
    WEL409 Grief and Loss

    Year 3 - Session 2
    HSS300 Professional Development
    WEL418 Case Management

    SESSION 2 INTAKE

    Year 1 - Session 2
    GER102 Gerontology Theory and Research
    SOC101 Introduction to Sociology

    Year 2 - Session 1
    HCS102 Communication and Human Services
    PHL101 Applied Ethics

    Year 2 - Session 2
    SPE211 Foundations in Social Policy
    PSY216 Psychology of Ageing

    Year 3 - Session 1
    WEL206 Facilitating Positive Behaviours
    IKC101 Indigenous Cultures, Histories and Contemporary Realities

    Year 3 - Session 2
    HSS300 Professional Development
    WEL418 Case Management

    Year 4 - Session 1
    GER204 Ageing and Professional Practice
    WEL409 Grief and Loss

    Fulltime Enrolment Pattern

    SESSION 1 INTAKE

    Year 1 - Session 1
    HCS102 Communication & Human Services
    PHL101 Applied Ethics
    IKC101 Indigenous Cultures, Histories and Contemporary Realities
    WEL206 Facilitating Positive Behaviours

    Year 1 - Session 2
    GER102 Gerontology Theory and Research
    SPE211 Foundations in Social Policy
    SOC101 Introductory Sociology
    PSY216 Psychology of Ageing

    Year 2 - Session 1
    GER204 Ageing and Professional Practice
    HSS300 Professional Development
    WEL409 Grief and Loss
    WEL418 Case Management

    SESSION 2 INTAKE

    Year 1 - Session 2
    GER102 Gerontology Theory and Research
    SPE211 Foundations in Social Policy
    SOC101 Introductory Sociology
    PSY216 Psychology of Ageing

    Year 2 - Session 1
    PHL101 Applied Ethics
    GER204 Ageing and Professional Practice
    WEL206 Facilitating Positive Behaviours
    WEL409 Grief and Loss

    Year 2 - Session 2
    HCS102 Communication & Human Services
    IKC101 Indigenous Cultures, Histories and Contemporary Realities
    HSS300 Professional Development
    WEL418 Case Management

  • Admission information

    To be admitted into the course, prospective students need to indicate their likelihood of success through successful completion of a two year full-time (or equivalent) Diploma of Community Welfare or similar, developed under the 2009 CHCO8 Community Services Training Package or the superseded CHC02 Community Services Training Package V3, and offered by Australian universities, TAFE’s and Registered Training Organisations (RTO’s).

    See standard CSU admission criteria

  • Cost of study

    Fees - please visit the fees and costs page or contact us for current fee information.

    Tax deduction - in some instances a tax deduction may be claimed for self education expenses. Please seek independent qualified taxation advice.

  • Course details

    Campus locations listed for Distance Education students are purely for administrative purposes and have no relevance to the student experience.

    Enrol TypeModeCampusFee typeSession1Session2Session3Admission Code
    DirectOn CampusPort MacquarieCGSYYNKAGE
    DirectDistance EducationPort MacquarieCGSYYNEAGE

    LEGEND
    CGS: Commonwealth Government supported places
    FPPG: Fee-paying postgraduate places
    FPOS: Fee-paying overseas student places
    Admission Code: For your reference if required during your application process
    NO TAC: An admission code is not required for applications to CSU Study Centres
    TEMP: An admission code has not yet been assigned for this course

    Graduation requirements

    To graduate, students must satisfactorily complete 192 points.

  • How to apply
    Apply direct to CSU

    An online application to CSU takes about 15 minutes to complete. Find out more

    Apply online

    This course is not available to international students.

    Thinking of deferring?

    Find out more about deferral

  • About the School
    School of Humanities and Social Sciences

    CSU’s School of Humanities and Social Sciences provides a supportive environment that builds authentic relationships, promotes critical thinking and encourages students to achieve their full potential. The School has more than 60 academic staff with specialisations in areas such as English, history, human services, justice studies, philosophy, politics, social work and sociology. Based on the Albury-Wodonga, Bathurst, Dubbo and Wagga Wagga campuses, the School offers a diverse environment, producing high quality research that makes a significant contribution to policy and practice.

  • Academic expectations

    For each 8 point subject at CSU, students should normally expect to spend between 140-160 hours engaged in the specified learning and assessment activities (such as attending lectures or residential schools, assigned readings, tutorial assistance, individual or group research/study, forum activity, workplace learning, assignments or examinations). The student workload for some subjects may vary from these norms as a result of approved course design.

    Students will be assessed on the basis of completed assignments, examinations, workplace learning, or other methods as outlined in specific subject outlines.

    Where applicable, students are responsible for travel and accommodation costs involved in workplace learning experiences, or attending residential schools (distance education students).

    Expectations relating to academic, workplace learning, time and cost requirements for specific subjects are provided in the subject abstracts and in course materials.

    Throughout their studies, CSU students have a responsibility to continue to develop skills in English Language, literacy and numeracy as appropriate to their discipline. This ongoing development will enable students to effectively participate in their course and graduate as competent professionals.

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