Bachelor of Veterinary Biology / Bachelor of Veterinary Science

Animal Vet Science

Bachelor of Veterinary Biology / Bachelor of Veterinary Science

Bachelor of Veterinary Biology / Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours)

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CSU's Bachelor of Veterinary Biology / Bachelor of Veterinary Science double degree is a six-year program that prepares graduates for a career as a registered veterinarian in Australia, New Zealand, Singapore and the United Kingdom.

  • Why study this course?

    CSU's Bachelor of Veterinary Biology / Bachelor of Veterinary Science arose from the need of rural communities for more veterinarians who wish to live and work in regional areas and who have the knowledge and skills to work with a broad range of animal species, from farm livestock to horses, companion animals and wildlife.

    The course has been designed in close consultation with the veterinary industry to address these needs and aims to provide highly competent veterinary graduates with a strong commitment to animal health, welfare and research, and to the development and protection of animal industries. Graduates will be able to pursue a career as a veterinarian in Australia, New Zealand, Singapore or the United Kingdom.

    What will I learn?

    You will develop skills in the diagnosis and management of disease in all common species of farm animals (cattle, sheep, pigs, poultry and fish) and companion animals (horses, dogs, cats and others). To achieve this, the course provides a solid grounding in agricultural production systems and the integration of nutrition, genetics, economics and epidemiology into the management of herds and flocks.

    In addition to your scientific and technical training, you will also develop a range of life and business skills which will help you in your work as a rural veterinarian.

    The course is broken into three phases. Phase one takes place over years one, two and the first half of year three and consists mainly of traditional lectures and tutorials. This phase is the foundation of veterinary science and provides you with a high level of knowledge in relevant sciences including pathology, parasitology, microbiology, nutrition, reproduction and the integration of veterinary medicine into animal production systems.

    Phase two takes place from the second half of year three, year four and the first half of year five. In this phase you have the opportunity to integrate all your prior learning in clinical, case-based contexts through a unique problem based learning (PBL) approach, internal rotations and in the spey clinic. You will receive clinical teaching in surgery, anesthesia, diagnostic imaging, individual animal medicine and population medicine. You will develop the ability to solve problems in the health and disease management of individual animals, herds and flocks.

    Your final phase, which takes place over the second half of year five and year six, fully prepares you to enter the workforce. You will cement your theoretical and practical knowledge through an extensive program of clinical rotations which take place in a wide variety of Veterinary practice settings.

    How will I learn?

    Your study will be based in a single rural site for the six years of your course. This creates a strong sense of collegiality between staff and students at all levels of the program. CSU also enjoys the support of an enthusiastic and interested rural community, ready access to a wide range of veterinary practices and farms, and the relaxed, enjoyable and affordable lifestyle which comes with living in a thriving regional centre of over 60,000 people.

    The course has been designed to develop a well rounded foundation of knowledge and a well developed set of practical and communication skills. To achieve this you will study in a range of learning environments such as lectures, tutorials, self directed learning activities, practicals and workplace environments.

    You will have the opportunity to develop very high level practical skills and the ability to apply theoretical knowledge to real life practice through a unique problem based learning program and through workplace learning opportunities.

    Veterinary Science is an academically challenging course which requires a high level of self discipline. You should expect to spend a minimum of 50 hours per week in both structured and unstructured (self directed) learning tasks. You will attend lectures, tutorials and practical classes for approximately 26-28 hours per week. In the final year of the course, you are required to complete a number of extramural placements of three-week duration at veterinary practices remote to Wagga Wagga.

    Eligibility

    Admission to this course is highly competitive, with over 400 applications received for the 60 available places each year. Successful applicants are able to demonstrate excellent academic achievements, as well as a genuine commitment to animals, livestock industries and to working in rural and regional communities.

    Applicants are required to meet the following selection criteria:

    • a high level of academic ability through previous studies. It is highly desirable to have studied science, particularly chemistry, and 3 Unit mathematics. Refer to the Admission information tab for more information
    • an interest in and commitment to rural communities, veterinary science and animal production
    • an understanding of the unique ethical and practical issues that confront veterinarians involved with rural practice and animal production
    • the capacity to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing.

    Please complete the eligibility checklist to establish whether you are eligible for entry into the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology / Bachelor of Veterinary Science.

    This course cannot normally be studied part-time, however exceptions for medical reasons may be considered. Students cannot defer the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology / Bachelor of Veterinary Science. If you are unable to accept your offer of a place, you must apply again in subsequent years. You subsequent applications will not be harmed by previously declining an offer.

    Graduating with Honours

    To graduate with a Bachelor of Veterinary Biology / Bachelor of Veterinary Science (Honours), students must first attain a grade point average (GPA) of 5 or higher (Credit average or higher) from all 8 point subjects studied in Years 2, 3 and 4. Then they must satisfactorily complete a research project during Year 5 while maintaining a high GPA from subjects studied in Years 4 and 5.

    Applications open on August 1 and close on the last Friday in September for entry the following year.

    • CSU Supplementary Application Form available
      1 August 2014
    • UAC applications open
      first week of August, refer to UAC website
    • Supplementary Application Form to be returned to CSU
      postmarked on or before 26 September 2014
    • UAC applications close
      26 September 2014
    • Applicants notified if selected for interview
      by 10 November 2014
    • Interviews held in Wagga Wagga
      4, 5, 8 and 9 December 2014
    Professional recognition

    This course is fully accredited with the Australian Veterinary Boards Council (AVBC), the Veterinary Council of New Zealand and the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in the UK. This means that graduates of CSU's Bachelor of Veterinary Biology / Bachelor of Veterinary Science will have achieved the necessary graduate attributes and will be eligible for registration as veterinarians in all states of Australia, in New Zealand, Singapore and the United Kingdom.

    To meet these professional expectations, CSU graduates must be able to demonstrate their ability to perform various animal handling, manipulative, therapeutic and diagnostic techniques.

    Facilities

    Students are afforded the opportunity to learn in some of the best facilities of their kind in the world. The purpose-built facilities are on a relaxed and spacious campus in one of the best cities in regional Australia.

    Some of the on campus facilities include:

    • animal handling facilities
    • campus farm and field sites
    • a state-of-the-art pre-clinical centre which includes the anatomy laboratory and museum
    • modern large animal hospital
    • modern veterinary teaching hospital (small animals)
    • state-of-the-art veterinary diagnostics laboratory
    • equine centre
    • practical classrooms
    • cutting-edge nuclear medicine (gamma camera)

  • Career opportunities

    Upon completion of the course, all students will have achieved the necessary graduate attributes to practise as a registered veterinarian in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

    Veterinarians may be employed in private practice and in herd management consultancy, the public sector, research and diagnostic services, pharmaceutical research and development, and captive animal health.

    Graduates of CSU's Bachelor Veterinary Biology/Bachelor of Veterinary Science enjoy outstanding employment prospects, with most being sought after by highly respected veterinary practices. All of the graduates from 2010 found employment in rural areas.

    As your final year finishes in August, you get an early start on choosing a job and commencing your professional life.

    Requirements for registration as a veterinarian

    The Veterinary Surgeons Board may refuse to register a person not deemed fit to practice veterinary science by reason of infirmity, injury, mental or physical illness, habitual drunkenness or addiction to a deleterious drug. In order to meet and maintain accreditation standards with the AVBC, CSU is required to train and graduate students who are eligible to be registered as veterinarians.

    This is a broad veterinary science degree; it is a requirement that graduates have the skills to practise veterinary medicine and surgery across all species of domestic and production animals, as well as native and wild animals. All students must demonstrate the ethical, physical and emotional capacity to participate in the full curriculum and to achieve the level of competence required by the School in order to graduate and be registered as a veterinarian.

  • Credit and pathways

    Credit will be granted for only a limited number of subjects in the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology / Bachelor of Veterinary Science. Under normal circumstances, credit will only be considered for the following subjects: ASC221 Animal Genetics, ASC273 Animal Nutrition, BCM210 Foundations and Techniques in Biochemistry and CHM102 Chemistry for Dental and Veterinary Sciences (prerequisite for VSC226). Credit eligibility will be conferred by the Subject Coordinator.

    Awarding of credit will not result in the shortening of the degree.

    If you are not accepted into this course the first time, you should make sure that veterinary science is the profession that you really want to pursue and seek career planning advice. If you have no Year 12 qualification or your ATAR was not high enough, you should concentrate on qualifying for admission to another course with a view to reapplying to CSU's Veterinary Science course in the future. You should choose a course that you think you will enjoy and do well in, and be happy to complete, should your future applications to CSU Veterinary Science be unsuccessful. It is also important to recognise the emphasis placed on commitment to farm animal production in the selection process.

    You can enrol in another CSU course and apply for an internal course transfer, however your application will be judged on its merits at the same time as applications from students at other universities. CSU students do not get preference in this competitive process. You will need to repeat the supplementary application form / interview process.

  • Workplace learning

    CSU's Bachelor of Veterinary Biology/Bachelor of Veterinary Science is unique in its focus on development of practical skills and client communication, particularly to agricultural business clients.  Throughout your course you will consistently have the opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to real life cases.Students begin learning in a real life practical environment in the CSU livestock facilities from first year where you animal handling pracs which includes cattle, sheep, horse, dog and cat handling.

    From the second half of year one, you will also begin attending placements in a wide range of vet clinics, some of which will occur during your holidays, building up to continuous three week rotations at a wide range of clinics, which may include participation in after hours patient care in your final year and a half of study.

    In your fourth year you will move into working with private commercial farms and in the equine and small animal teaching facilities during internal rotations. Internal rotations involve attending five different rotations which include dairy, farm animal, small animal, equine and clinical (anesthetics and diagnostic imaging) and prepares you for the transition from theory to practice which you begin in the second half of your fourth year.

    During this practical component students will see a wide range of cases, develop important diagnostic, animal handling and client communication skills as well as a thorough understanding and familiarity with the way different clinics operate, all of which will provide them with a competitive edge as a new graduate.

    In the first three years, students are required to travel to veterinary practices within a radius of about 100km of Wagga Wagga. Students will either need a car of their own or will travel with another student who may expect some contribution for travel expenses. The University does not contribute to these costs.

    In the last three sessions of the course students will travel to several off campus locations in three week blocks of clinical rotations. Some funding is available to assist with these additional expenses.

    Please note that the following subjects have a Workplace Learning component:

    VSC118 Veterinary Practice 1
    VSC450 Clinical Practice 3
    VSC465 Clinical Rotation 7- Livestock Industries
    VSC462 Clinical Rotation 4 - Rural Practice
    VSC466 Clinical Rotation 8 - Mixed Practice
    VSC470 Clinical Rotation 10 - Clinical Extramural Studies 3
    VSC331 Diagnosis and Critical Thinking in Veterinary Science
    VSC410 Clinical Practice 1
    VSC463 Clinical Rotation 5 - Veterinary Diagnostic Services
    VSC467 Clinical Rotation 9 - State Veterinary Medicine
    VSC464 Clinical Rotation 6- Specialism Practice
    VSC456 Clinical Rotation 1 - Equine Practice
    VSC461 Clinical Rotation 3 - Dairy Cattle Practice
    VSC218 Veterinary Practice 2
    VSC457 Clinical Rotation 2 - Small Animal Practice
    VSC420 Clinical Practice 2

  • Subjects

    The below information is for new students. Current students should select their subjects by checking the Handbook for the year of their enrolment

    Course structure

    REVISED CASIMS FIELDS IN COURSE PROFILE

    BACHELOR OF VETERINARY BIOLOGY / BACHELOR OF VETERINARY SCIENCE (HONOURS) INTEGRATED HONOURS

    This course consists of 384 points for both Pass and Honours streams:

    Course Structure for standard student entry


    Compulsory subjects for both Pass and Honours streams (360 points; 45 subjects)


    CHM102 Chemistry for Dental and Veterinary Sciences
    ASC221 Animal Genetics
    ASC262 Veterinary Reproduction
    ASC273 Animal Nutrition
    ASC370 Ruminant Production and Welfare
    ASC474 Intensive Animal Production and Welfare
    BCM210 Foundations and Techniques in Biochemistry
    VSC110 Animal Production and Welfare
    VSC113 Fundamentals of Veterinary Cell Biology
    VSC114 Applied Veterinary Epidemiology
    VSC115 Pastures and Profits in Grazing Systems
    VSC118 Veterinary Practice 1
    VSC223 Veterinary Histology and Immunology
    VSC218 Veterinary Practice 2
    VSC224 Veterinary Anatomy
    VSC225 Comparative Anatomy
    VSC226 Veterinary Physiology
    VSC227 Applied Veterinary Physiology
    VSC310 Principles of Pathobiology
    VSC321 Principles of Clinical and Systematic Pathology
    VSC323 Veterinary Microbiology and Parasitology
    VSC324 Veterinary Pharmacology, Diagnostics and Therapeutics
    VSC331 Diagnosis and Critical Thinking in Veterinary Science
    VSC332 Advanced Animal Nutrition & Biochemistry
    VSC415 Population Medicine
    VSC416 Production Animal Medicine 1
    VSC417 Companion Animal Medicine and Surgery 1
    VSC418 Public Health and Biosecurity 1
    VSC425 Companion Animal Medicine and Surgery 2
    VSC426 Production Animal Medicine 2
    VSC427 Companion Animal Medicine and Surgery 3
    VSC410 Clinical Practice 1
    VSC420 Clinical Practice 2
    VSC450 Clinical Practice 3
    VSC451 Companion Animal Medicine and Surgery 4
    VSC453 Public Health and Biosecurity 2
    VSC455 Transition to the Profession
    VSC456 Clinical Rotation 1 - Equine Practice
    VSC457 Clinical Rotation 2 - Small Animal Practice
    VSC461 Clinical Rotation 3 - Dairy Cattle Practice
    VSC462 Clinical Rotation 4 - Rural Practice
    VSC463 Clinical Rotation 5 - Veterinary Diagnostic Services
    VSC467 Clinical Rotation 9 - State Veterinary Medicine
    VSC470 Clinical Rotation 10 - Clinical Extramural Studies 3
    VSC460 Veterinary Professional Practice


    Restricted elective subjects for Pass stream only (24 points)
    24 POINTS CHOSEN FROM:

    VSC464 Clinical Rotation 6 - Specialism Practice
    VSC465 Clinical Rotation 7 - Livestock Industries
    VSC466 Clinical Rotation 8 - Mixed Practice
    Compulsory subjects for Honours stream only (16 points; 1 subject)
    HRS417 Science Honours Project/Dissertation (16 points)

    Restricted elective subjects for Honours stream only (8 points)
    8 POINTS CHOSEN FROM:

    VSC464 Clinical Rotation 6 - Specialism Practice
    VSC465 Clinical Rotation 7 - Livestock Industries

    BACHELOR OF VETERINARY BIOLOGY (Exit point only course)

    CHM102 Chemistry for Dental and Veterinary Sciences
    ASC221 Animal Genetics
    ASC262 Veterinary Reproduction
    ASC273 Animal Nutrition
    ASC370 Ruminant Production and Welfare
    ASC474 Intensive Animal Production and Welfare
    BCM210 Foundations and Techniques in Biochemistry
    VSC110 Animal Production and Welfare
    VSC113 Fundamentals of Veterinary Cell Biology
    VSC114 Applied Veterinary Epidemiology
    VSC115 Pastures and Profits in Grazing Systems
    VSC118 Veterinary Practice 1
    VSC223 Veterinary Histology and Immunology
    VSC218 Veterinary Practice 2
    VSC224 Veterinary Anatomy
    VSC225 Comparative Anatomy
    VSC226 Veterinary Physiology
    VSC227 Applied Veterinary Physiology
    VSC310 Principles of Pathobiology
    VSC321 Principles of Clinical and Systematic Pathology
    VSC323 Veterinary Microbiology and Parasitology
    VSC324 Veterinary Pharmacology, Diagnostics and Therapeutics
    VSC331 Diagnosis and Critical Thinking in Veterinary Science
    VSC332 Advanced Animal Nutrition & Biochemistry
     

    Enrolment pattern

    Common to pass and Honours streams

    Full-time

    Phase 1
    Session 1 (Session 1)

    CHM102 Chemistry for Dental and Veterinary Sciences
    VSC113 Fundamentals of Veterinary Cell Biology
    VSC110 Animal Production and Welfare
    VSC118 Veterinary Practice 1 (commenced)

    Session 2 (Session 2)
    VSC114 Applied Veterinary Epidemiology
    VSC115 Pastures and Profits in Grazing Systems
    VSC224 Veterinary Anatomy
    ASC221 Animal Genetics
    VSC118 Veterinary Practice 1 (completed)

    Session 3 (Session 1)
    BCM210 Foundations and Techniques in Biochemistry
    VSC225 Comparative Anatomy
    VSC226 Veterinary Physiology
    VSC218 Veterinary Practice 2 (commenced)

    Session 4 (Session 2)
    ASC273 Animal Nutrition
    ASC370 Ruminant Production and Welfare
    VSC223 Veterinary Histology and Immunology
    VSC227 Applied Veterinary Physiology
    VSC218 Veterinary Practice 2 (completed)


    Session 5 (Session 1)
    ASC262 Veterinary Reproduction
    ASC474 Intensive Animal Production and Welfare
    VSC310 Principles of Pathobiology
    VSC332 Advanced Animal Nutrition & Biochemistry

    Session 6 (Session 2)
    VSC321 Principles of Clinical and Systematic Pathology
    VSC323 Veterinary Microbiology and Parasitology
    VSC324 Veterinary Pharmacology, Diagnostics and Therapeutics
    VSC331 Diagnosis and Critical Thinking in Veterinary Science

    Students may elect to exit at this point with the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology BVetBiology (exit point only). Students cannot progress to Fourth Year until the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology is completed.

    Phase 2

    Session 7 (Session 1)
    VSC410 Clinical Practice 1
    VSC415 Population Medicine
    VSC416 Production Animal Medicine 1
    VSC417 Companion Animal Medicine and Surgery 1

    Session 8 (Session 2)
    VSC418 Public Health and Biosecurity 1
    VSC420 Clinical Practice 2
    VSC425 Companion Animal Medicine and Surgery 2
    VSC426 Production Animal Medicine 2

    Pass stream

    Session 9 (Session 1)
    VSC427 Companion Animal Medicine and Surgery 3
    VSC453 Public Health and Biosecurity 2
    VSC451 Companion Animal Medicine and Surgery 4
    VSC450 Clinical Practice 3

    Students cannot progress to Phase 3 until Phase 2 is completed.

    Phase 3

    Session 10 (Session 2)
    VSC455 Transition to the Profession
    VSC456 Clinical Rotation 1 Equine Practice
    VSC457 Clinical Rotation 2 - Small Animal Practice
    VSC466 Clinical Rotation 8 - Mixed Practice

    Session 11 (Session 3)
    VSC461 Clinical Rotation 3 - Dairy Cattle Practice
    VSC462 Clinical Rotation 4 - Rural Practice
    VSC464 Clinical Rotation 6 – Specialism Practice
    VSC465 Clinical Rotation 7 – Livestock Industries

    Session 12 (Session 1)
    VSC463 Clinical Rotation 5 - Veterinary Diagnostic Services
    VSC467 Clinical Rotation 9 - State Veterinary Medicine
    VSC470 Clinical Rotation 10 – Clinical Extramural Studies 3
    VSC460 Veterinary Professional Practice


    Honours stream

    Session 9 (Session 1)
    VSC427 Companion Animal Medicine and Surgery 3
    VSC453 Public Health and Biosecurity 2
    VSC450 Clinical Practice 3
    VSC451 Companion Animal Medicine and Surgery 4

    Students cannot progress to Phase 3 until Phase 2 is completed.

    Phase 3

    Session 10 (Session 2)
    VSC455 Transition to the Profession
    HRS417 Science Honours Project/Dissertation (16)(commenced, 8 points)
    VSC456 Clinical Rotation 1 - Equine Practice
    VSC457 Clinical Rotation 2 - Small Animal Practice

    Session 11 (Session 3)
    HRS417 Science Honours Project/Dissertation (16) (completed, 8 points)
    VSC461 Clinical Rotation 3 - Dairy Cattle Practice
    VSC462 Clinical Rotation 4 - Rural Practice
    VSC464 Clinical Rotation 6 - Specialism Practice OR VSC465 Clinical Rotation 7 - Livestock Industries

    Session 12 (Session 1)
    VSC463 Clinical Rotation 5 - Veterinary Diagnostic Services
    VSC467 Clinical Rotation 9 - State Veterinary Medicine
    VSC470 Clinical Rotation 10 – Clinical Extramural Studies 3
    VSC460 Veterinary Professional Practice
     

  • Residential schools

    The following subjects may have a residential school component:

    ASC370 Ruminant Production and Welfare
    BCM210 Foundations and Techniques in Biochemistry
    ASC273 Animal Nutrition

  • Admission information

    Australian and New Zealand students

    Academic requirements

    There are no formal prerequisites for the Veterinary Science course at CSU, but as it is a science based course, it is highly recommended that school leavers will have studied mathematics and chemistry at Year 12 level and university students will have studied a science based degree at university. If you have not studied these subjects and are accepted to the course, it is strongly recommended you undertake a STUDY LINK subject before commencing the degree.

    The following three points apply to any applicants who wish to be considered for entry into the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology / Bachelor of Veterinary Science.

    • study must have been undertaken within the last 10 years
    • there is no special pathway for mature aged students
    • STAT test scores are not considered.

    All applicants must be able to meet the selection criteria and also be able to meet one of the categories listed in the academic requirements. Approximately half the applicants to this course have previously studied at university.

    School leavers, gap year students and university students who will not have completed one year full-time equivalent by the end of the current year

    • a minimum ATAR of 90 for applicants who attended a metropolitan school, an OP of approximately 6 for Queensland students or an IB of approximately 33
    • for applicants eligible to receive the CSU Regional Bonus, a minimum ATAR of 85 or an OP of approximately 8 for Queensland students. Applicants who attended a non-metropolitan school for their final two years of high school are eligible for the bonus.

    Students who have previously attended university

    Undergraduate applicants

    • one or two years full-time equivalent - a minimum GPA of 5.1
    • three or more years full-time equivalent - a minimum GPA of 4.8

    Postgraduate applicants

    All postgraduate courses must be satisfactorily completed or the applicable GPA achieved.

    Honours

    • Coursework Honours: GPA minimum of 5.0(must have completed one year full-time equivalent)
    • Integrated Honours: GPA minimum of 5.0
    • Research Honours: Honours Class 1
    • Master
      • Coursework Master: GPA minimum of 4.8 (must have completed one year full-time equivalent)
      • Completed Research Master

      PhD

      • Completed PhD

      For consideration of other postgraduate qualifications not listed, please contact the Veterinary Science Admissions Officer by email: vetselections@csu.edu.au

      Please note: A Grade Point Average (GPA) of 5.0 is equivalent to a Credit average. The GPA is an average over all sessions in which you studied. Your most recent degree will be considered.

      Application process for Australian citizens and residents

      As there is a high demand for entry into this course, please note that students are selected based on the selection criteria.

      Applications open on 1 August and close the last Friday in September for entry the following year. Applications must be postmarked on or before this date. Late applications will not be accepted.

      The application process involves three steps:

      • apply through UAC - this course cannot be added to your UAC preferences after the UAC closing date
      • complete and submit a Supplementary Application Form - this provides the opportunity to demonstrate your commitment to animals, livestock industries and rural and regional communities
      • if selected after assessment of your application form, attend an interview at Charles Sturt University in Wagga Wagga. Interview does not guarantee entry into the course. Interviews are held over four business days commencing the first Thursday in December and include 20 minutes of reading time, a 20-minute face-to-face interview and a 30-minute literacy and numeracy exercise. Two-hour tours of the campus are also available.

      The Supplementary Application Form, which includes detailed instructions on applying, must be submitted to the School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences directly and must be postmarked on or before the last Friday in September.

      The aim of the interview is to validate the statements you made in the Supplementary Application Form regarding your interest in and commitment to animal production and rural and regional veterinary practice. The interview is also an opportunity for you to demonstrate your communication skills. The aim of the written communication task, which is held over the interview days, is to assess your written communication skills and your ability to think clearly and critically in a short period of time under test conditions

      From the interview approximately 60 students will be made an offer to enrol into the course.

      Year 12 students are also required to request their school (principal or careers adviser) to submit the Predicted Score Letter. This is to be sent electronically directly to CSU.

      Forms
      The following forms are required to apply for the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology / Bachelor of Veterinary Science:
      If I am not accepted into the course the first time, what should I do?

      First, you should make sure that Veterinary Science is the profession that you really want to pursue and seek career planning advice. If you have no Year 12 qualification or your ATAR was not high enough, you should concentrate on qualifying for admission to another course with a view to reapplying to CSU's Veterinary Science course in the future. It is also important to recognise the emphasis placed on commitment to farm animal production in the selection process.

      You should choose a course that you think you will enjoy and do well in, and be happy to complete should your future applications to Veterinary Science at CSU be unsuccessful. You can enrol in another CSU course and apply for an internal course transfer, however your application will be judged on its merits at the same time as applications from students at other universities. CSU students do not get preference in this competitive process. You will need to repeat the Supplementary Application Form / interview process.

    International students

    Note: If you are an international student but living in and undertaking an educational qualification in Australia, follow the application procedures as for Australian citizens and residents. See Admission requirements.

    CSU is one of Australia's highly respected national universities, offering almost 400 courses to more than 38,000 students worldwide.

    As a national university for the professions, CSU prides itself on providing practical, hands-on courses that ensure graduates are prepared for a range of employment opportunities. You will enhance your future by studying at CSU.

    More information about studying at CSU

    Application process for international applicants

    To gain entry to the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology / Bachelor of Veterinary Science, international applicants are required to meet the following selection criteria:

    • a high level of academic ability through previous studies
    • an interest in, and commitment to, rural communities, veterinary science and animal production
    • an understanding of the unique ethical and practical issues that confront veterinarians involved with rural practice and animal production
    • the capacity to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing
    • have completed the International Language Testing System (IELTS) or other government approved language test with an average overall score of 7.0 or better, with a minimum of 7.0 in all sections, undertaken within the last two years, or have completed formal education in an English-speaking country.

    More about selection criteria for international students

    Download the Supplementary Application Form - international

    Application closing dates

    Applications open on 1 August and close on 26 September 2014 for entry in 2015. Applications received after 26 September will be considered for entry in 2016.

    Application to the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology / Bachelor of Veterinary Science involves a number of steps:

    1. Apply online. Applications received after 26 September 2014 will not be considered for entry in 2015. Ensure you submit your complete academic transcript, including grade key and any other information that will assist in converting your grade
    2. Complete and submit the International Supplementary Application Form to the School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences. Email the completed application to: vetselections@csu.edu.au
    3. Supplementary application forms will only be accepted between 1 August and 30 September each year. No late entries will be accepted.
    4. Applicants selected for interview will be advised by email in due course. Interviews will be conducted by telephone.
    Credit

    Credit will be granted for only a limited number of subjects in the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology / Bachelor of Veterinary Science. Under normal circumstances, credit will only be considered for the following subjects: ASC221 Animal Genetics, ASC273 Animal Nutrition, BCM210 Foundations & Techniques in Biochemistry and CHM102 Chemistry for Dental and Veterinary Sciences (prerequisite for VSC226).

    Credit eligibility will be conferred by the Subject Coordinator for each subject. Awarding of credit will not result in the shortening of the degree.

    Contact

    For information regarding the International Supplementary Application please email: vetselections@csu.edu.au

    Recruitment agents

    CSU's International Recruitment Representatives (agents) are trained to provide you with information about CSU and its courses and will help you find the answers to all your questions.

    More information about recruitment agents.

    Cost of study

    For more information about fees, visit the Cost of study tab. Allowance must also be made for additional costs such as accommodation, books, protective clothing (laboratory coat, overalls, boots) and travel to veterinary practices to complete the required work placements during the course.

    Selection criteria

    To gain entry to the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology / Bachelor of Veterinary Science, international applicants are required to meet the following selection criteria:

    • a high level of academic ability through previous studies
    • an interest in, and commitment to, rural communities, veterinary science and animal production
    • an understanding of the unique ethical and practical issues that confront veterinarians involved with rural practice and animal production
    • the capacity to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing
    • have completed the International Language Testing System (IELTS) or other government approved language test with an average overall score of 7.0 or better, with a minimum of 7.0 in all sections, undertaken within the last two years, or have completed formal education in an English-speaking country.

    More about selection criteria for international students [PDF]


    See standard CSU admission criteria

  • Cost of study
    In addition to your tuition fees, you will need to buy prescribed textbooks and may purchase additional books to help with your studies. Scientific texts can cost between $100 and $150 each. Protective clothing (laboratory coat, overalls, boots) is also required from the first week or two of the course. There are additional costs associated with travel to veterinary practices for workplace learning components of the course. The University does not contribute to these costs. Scholarships are available to assist with costs. 

    Fees are relevant for 2015 only and are subject to change in future years. Tuition fees quoted do not include the Student Services and Amenities Fee.

    Tuition costs
    Commonwealth supported place

    You will make a student contribution (formerly HECS) towards the cost of your tuition fees. Commonwealth supported places may be limited for this course.

    Options:

    1. Defer your payment using a HECS-HELP loan, which is repaid through the taxation system once your income reaches a certain threshold
    2. Pay your student contribution fee up-front each session
    9872*Student contribution fee for your first year of study

    * This is an estimated fee for your first year of study based on a full-time study load (eight 8 point subjects). Should you be studying less than eight subjects in your first year, the fees would be decreased proportionally. This figure excludes the Student Services and Amenities fee. If your entire course is less than the equivalent of one year of full-time study, then the figure displayed is calculated as a percentage of a full-time study load e.g. 50%.

    More about Commonwealth supported places

    On campus (onshore) study mode
    6300*Tuition fee per 8 point subject

    * Fee for students commencing study in 2015.

    More information about international student fees

  • Course details
    Enrol TypeModeCampusFee typeSession1Session2Session3Admission Code
    UACOn CampusWagga WaggaCGSYNN214964
    DirectOn CampusWagga WaggaFPOSYNNISBU
    DirectOn CampusWagga WaggaCGSYNNKSBU

    LEGEND
    CGS: Commonwealth Government supported places
    FFPG: Fee-paying postgraduate places
    FPOS: Fee-paying overseas student places
    Admission Code: For your reference if required during your application process
    NO TAC: An admission code is not required for applications to CSU Study Centres
    TEMP: An admission code has not yet been assigned for this course

    Graduation requirements

    To graduate, students must satisfactorily complete 384 points, including all embedded clinical competencies.

  • How to apply

    Applications for the Bachelor of Veterinary Biology / Bachelor of Veterinary Science close on 26 September 2014 for intake in 2015. The Supplementary Application Form must be postmarked on or before that date.

    Download the Supplementary Application Form [DOC]

    Download Veterinary Science additional section 3 [DOC]

    Apply through UAC

    Apply through the Universities Admissions Centre (UAC) if you are a school leaver wanting to study on campus.

    Apply through UAC

    Apply direct to CSU

    An online application to CSU takes about 15 minutes to complete. Find out more

    Apply online

    Download the Supplementary Application Form - International [DOC]

    Apply direct to CSU

    Apply direct to CSU for on campus study at a CSU regional campus, or study by distance education.

    Apply online

    Recruitment agent

    Contact a Recruitment agent in your country who can answer your questions about CSU as well as help with the student visa application process.

    International recruitment agents

    CRICOS Code(s)

    068968D (Wagga Wagga)

    Thinking of deferring?

    Find out more about deferral

  • Academic expectations

    For each 8 point subject at CSU, students should normally expect to spend between 140-160 hours engaged in the specified learning and assessment activities (such as attending lectures or residential schools, assigned readings, tutorial assistance, individual or group research/study, forum activity, workplace learning, assignments or examinations). The student workload for some subjects may vary from these norms as a result of approved course design.

    Students will be assessed on the basis of completed assignments, examinations, workplace learning, or other methods as outlined in specific subject outlines.

    Where applicable, students are responsible for travel and accommodation costs involved in workplace learning experiences, or attending residential schools (distance education students).

    Expectations relating to academic, workplace learning, time and cost requirements for specific subjects are provided in the subject abstracts and in course materials.

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(International +61 2 6338 6077)

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