2016 Projects

Title (Projects)

Two Sisters' Eco-Walk

Project Description

The Wagga Wagga Campus is positioned between two distinctive hills (the Two Sisters), which form part of the campus biodiversity zones. The Campus Environmental Committee has a vision to establish an eco-walk encompassing both hilltops with a loop track. This will enable engagement with the wider public around the benefits of preserving and enhancing the local biodiversity. We'll promote local Wiradjuri history through the eco-walk name and by telling of the dreamtime story of the Seven Sisters.

This project aims to expand on the work done by the Green Corps and CSU Green on Bald Hill (the western Sister) to achieve a simple defined track on the eastern hill. The eco-walk will be accessed via stiles, defined using marker posts, and will incorporate a vantage point and Wagga Experiment Farm's historical ruins from 1897. Interpretive signs will inform walkers about local biodiversity and historical features.

Project Contact

Collin James

Funding

$15,000

Title (Projects)

Mountain bike track at CSU Albury-Wodonga Campus to promote sustainable living Student Project

Project Description

The CSU mountain bike trail concept consists of a 950-metre trail connecting the existing crushed rock path network with the Hume and Hovel track. This alignment takes in any available points of interest or treed areas and where possible, avoids possible winter wet spots. The site is relatively flat with a total elevation change of 11 metres. As per the International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA) Trail Difficulty Rating System (TDRS) without the construction of technical trail features this loop would fall under the Easy (Green Circle) category. The trail may be used as a bidirectional trail or used in conjunction with the existing crushed rock path network to form a loop.

Project Contact

Chloe Grey & Hannah Gubb

Funding

$15,000

Title (Projects)

CSU CampusFlora

Project Description

The CampusFlora project at Sydney University demonstrated the power of mobile learning technologies to turn whole campus environments into learning spaces for sustainability. The CSU CampusFlora project will develop an app that will reinforce the core concepts of sustainability for the community using our unique flora.

The database will include plant locations, botanical and ethnobotanical information. This will also enhance access to already successful projects such as Orange Campus's Aboriginal Nature and Bioscience Park and the Paths, Walks and Tracks on Wagga Wagga Campus. The power of the app is in its adaptability to offer a range of educational narratives across all CSU campuses, to enhance community awareness of our botanical environment and highlight the cultural significance of our indigenous plants. The vision is for the University community and the community at large to have the opportunity to contribute to our own unique CSU CampusFlora app.

Project Contact

John Harper

Funding

$5000

Title (Research)

Optimal design of regional cities to conserve biodiversity

Abstract

Urban areas house half of the world's human population, and by 2050 they will house an additional 2.5 billion people (United Nations, 2014). Urbanisation is a major driver of biodiversity loss globally as it results in the loss of native vegetation (Savard et al., 2000; McKinney, 2002), altered nutrient cycles (Walsh et al., 2005; Grimm et al., 2008), and changes to climate (Arnfield, 2003; Jenerette et al., 2007; Pickett et al., 2011).

A key question is therefore how can we ensure that the growth of urban populations has minimal impact on biodiversity?

In this project, we will uncover the optimal approach to conserving biodiversity in Australia's growing regional city: Albury. By combining ecological field surveys, ecological modelling, and optimisation of biodiversity indices under current and future scenarios of urban growth, we will reveal the optimal way to grow regional towns like Albury while minimising harm to biodiversity.

Chief Investigator

Dale Nimmo

Funding

$9808

Title (Research)

Exploring the narratives of the Anthropocene

Abstract

This project is designed to both critically explore and draw attention to the past and current decisions and actions, which now constitute the built and natural environment of CSU Bathurst Campus and the adjoining Bathurst Agricultural Research Station (BARS).

We must urgently consider the capacity for recognition and subsequent adaption, preservation, or destruction of both natural and human-created resources. BARS was recently decommissioned.

The project will research communication of the Anthropocene, using these lands as a case study; from original Wiradjuri usage through to agricultural and horticultural experimentation, research and education. Many stories and some remnants remain of significant orchards and buildings, which hosted important experiments and research endeavours.

We aim to research, record, and publish layered narratives about activities on these lands, critically framed by the Anthropocene.

Chief Investigator

Ann Lazarsfeld-Jensen

Funding

$10,000

Title (Research)

A new and safe method of disposal of hospital waste: preliminary investigation of the contents of waste from surgery

Abstract

Hospital waste is treated and placed in landfill with heavy environmental impact. This project will provide the basis for new technology for safe disposal of hospital waste with minimum impact and maximum efficiency. Microwave pyrolysis sterilises and degrades components of waste into products that can be used as a source for energy generation and other uses. For this application, we will observe and measure the types and amounts of materials that go into waste. We'll do this from operating theatres, and through websites and direct contact with manufacturers to investigate the physical and chemical properties of samples of such waste.

The next stage (further grant applications including ARC) will use these data to inform the project to test micropyrolised waste by using biochemical/elemental analysis to assess variability, safety and potential use of end products. Once developed, the unit will be installed on site at a hospital, or can be mobile for use in remote areas or at disaster zones.

Materials scientists at CSU and UQ will test end products from the waste and determine safe, effective and profitable ways to turn these into saleable and useable products.

Chief Investigator

Linda Shields

Funding

$9948.02

Title (Grass Roots)

The GreenVillage Share Farm  Student Project

Project Description

To provide the cottages of Gobba Village (specifically the area of top Siberia – buildings 381, 383, 385, 387 and 389) and nearby residence of Murrumbidgee Village with a year-round fresh supply of herbs. This audience consists of 34 people in Gobba Village and an additional 15 people from other nearby residences.

We aim to grow and develop basic seasonal vegetables that all people can use for day-to-day meals (simply veggies, such as lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, etc). We'll also encourage health and wellbeing awareness through the consumption of fresh and healthy produce.

This will come across in a few different ways:

  • Communal cooking events using appropriate seasonal produce (this is a chance to both educate people on basic cooking skills, as well as provide them with a hearty meal, sourced directly from our veggie patch)
  • A compost system within the nearby cottages will educate people on the value of their 'rubbish' and encourage the idea of communal living and self-sustainability. This compost system will take place in cottages 381, 383, 385, 387 and 389.

Project Contact

Ben Brooke

Funding

$500

Title (Grass Roots)

Synapses Student Magazine - Sustainable Printing/ Production

Project Description

Synapses is the CSU student magazine produced by students, for students. The magazine is a Writer's Guild publication. The purpose of this green initiative is to ensure that the student magazine is produced sustainably. This will involve initially engaging a local printing company to supply the magazine on quality recycled paper. We will ensure the printing company uses 100% recycled paper to help protect the environment. By using 100% recycled paper, CSU will improve efficiency and reduce waste as recycled paper reduces the amount that goes to landfill. In turn, this reduces the amount of waste produced by CSU.

We will promote a green image that communicates trust and responsibility, which will aid the reputation of the CSU student magazine. By supporting a local printing company, we will help to ensure there is an economic and financial benefit for our local community, in terms of jobs and business. Also, by printing locally, we will reduce the cost of producing the student magazine. There will also be no delivery costs.

We will develop a strong working relationship with the local printer to ensure a quality green product is produced each month. In the long term, the aim will be to go greener by working toward producing an online Synapses – making it cutting-edge. We will look to fund a student sustainability writer and/or a graphic designer. We will also look to fund a student to assist in building relationships with sustainability-minded businesses in Port Macquarie and to request funding support, sponsorship, and advertising in Synapses. This would allow the system to be self-perpetuating.

Project Contact

Clara Kosh

Funding

$1200

Title (Grass Roots)

Tree-planting and North Shore clean up (North pier) Port Macquarie Campus

Project Description

Purchase t-shirts for staff and students with CSU Green and CSU logo for wearing at initiatives organised by the Campus Environmental Sustainability Committee. Initiatives are Tree Planting Day on 31July and North Shore clean up on 10 September 2016.

Purchase 10 litter pickers, five small tree planting shovel or plumbers shovel and 20 pairs of gardening gloves for the North Shore clean up.

Both these initiatives align with CSU sustainability targets, specifically: 1. Increasing biodiversity (flora and fauna); engaging staff in environmental sustainability; 2. Fostering behavioural change; 4. Promoting social responsibility and wellbeing within the workplace.

Project Contact

Nigel Urwin

Funding

$950

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