Bachelor of Health and Rehabilitation Science Articulated Set

includes:

Bachelor of Health and Rehabilitation Science
Associate Degree in Health and Rehabilitation Science [Exit Point Only]
Diploma of Health and Rehabilitation Science [Exit Point Only]

Awards

The course includes the following awards:

Associate Degree in Health and Rehabilitation Science AssocDegHlth&RehabSc

Bachelor of Health and Rehabilitation Science BHlth&RehabSc

Diploma of Health and Rehabilitation Science DipHlth&RehabSc

Availability

Bachelor of Health and Rehabilitation Science (4409RS)

On Campus - Albury-Wodonga
Online - Albury-Wodonga

Availability is subject to change, please verify prior to enrolment.

Normal Course Duration

Diploma of Health and Rehabilitation Science [Exit Point Only]

Full-time: 1.0 year (or part-time equivalent)

Bachelor of Health and Rehabilitation Science

Full-time: 3.0 years (or part-time equivalent)

Associate Degree in Health and Rehabilitation Science [Exit Point Only]

Full-time: 2.0 years (or part-time equivalent)

Course duration is the effective time taken to complete a course when studied full-time (full-time equivalent duration). Students are advised to consult the Enrolment Pattern to determine length of study. Not all courses are offered in full-time mode.

Admission Criteria

CSU Admission Policy

Bachelor of Health and Rehabilitation Science

A completed High School Certificate with an ATAR equivalent of 65 (including adjustment factors) or equivalent.
OR
Successful completion of two university level subjects (AQF level Associate Degree or higher) demonstrating a reasonable prospect of success through the Grade Point Average (GPA) gained in these studies.
OR
A completed AQF Certificate III or higher level qualification.
OR
50% completion of an AQF Diploma level qualification.
OR
A completed Tertiary Preparation Course from an Australian University or an accredited provider demonstrating a reasonable prospect of success through the Grade Point Average (GPA) gained in these studies.
AND
English language requirements apply. An Academic IELTS of 6.5 with no score below a 6.5 in each of the individual skill areas or a qualification deemed equivalent.

Credit

CSU Credit Policy

Bachelor of Health and Rehabilitation Science

Standard CSU Credit Policy applies: https://policy.csu.edu.au/document/view-current.php?id=120

Associate Degree in Health and Rehabilitation Science [Exit Point Only]

Award of credit will align with the CSU Credit Policy https://policy.csu.edu.au/document/view-current.php?id=120

Diploma of Health and Rehabilitation Science [Exit Point Only]

Award of credit will align with the CSU Credit Policy https://policy.csu.edu.au/document/view-current.php?id=120

Articulation

The Bachelor, Associate Degree [Exit Point Only] and Diploma [Exit Point Only] make up an articulated set of courses and credit is given in each higher level course for the subjects completed in the lower.

Graduation Requirement

Bachelor of Health and Rehabilitation Science

To graduate students must satisfactorily complete 192 points.

Associate Degree in Health and Rehabilitation Science [Exit Point Only]

To graduate students must satisfactorily complete 128 points.

Diploma of Health and Rehabilitation Science [Exit Point Only]

To graduate students must satisfactorily complete 64 points.

Course Structure

Course structure
All students complete 144 points of core subjects. Students accrue an additional 48 points from a combination of restricted and unrestricted electives.

Core Subjects
BMS161 Health and the Human Body  Cells, Immunity & Musculoskeletal
BMS162 Health and the Human Body II - Systemic Human Physiology
BMS171 Introduction to Functional Human Anatomy
BMS172 Functional Anatomy of the Vertebral Column, Pelvic Girdle, & Lower Limb
BMS255 Neuroscience for Health Practice
BMS256 Exercise Science for Health Practice
BMS263 Pharmacology for Allied Health Professionals
BMS271 Functional Anatomy of the Head, Neck, Pectoral Girdle, & Upper Limb
HIP100 Introduction to Health & Rehabilitation
HIP112 Communication for Health Practice
HIP202 Research for Health Practice
HIP203 Health and Development Through the Lifespan
HIP213 Rehabilitation Principles and Contexts
HIP301 Complex Cases in Rehabilitation (16 points)
IKC100 Indigenous Health
PSY111 Foundations of Psychology for Health and Human Services
SOC108 Sociology of Health and Health Care

Electives for Minors
The minors offered at CSU include Disability; Exercise Science; Gerontology; Nutrition; Public Health.

Disability Minor

HIP302 Understanding Healthy Communities
WEL206 Facilitating Positive Behaviours
WEL217 Social Dimensions of Disability
WEL218 Developing Cross Cultural Competencies
WEL228 Disability Issues for Families
WEL418 Case Management

Exercise Science Minor

BMS257 Movement Science OR EHR218 Biomechanics
EHR211 Functional Anatomy & Human Performance
EHR214 Skill Acquisition
EHR221 Conditioning & Physical Activity
EHR225 Growth, Motor Development & Ageing
EHR331 Exercise, Health & Disease
EHR332 Nutrition for Health & Performance

Gerontology Minor

GER102 Gerontology Theory and Research
GER204 Introduction to Ageing
GER402 Ageing Bodies, Ageing Minds
PSY216 Psychology of Ageing
WEL206 Facilitating Positive Behaviours
WEL418 Case Management

Nutrition Minor

BMS208 Human Nutrition
EHR332 Nutrition for Health & Performance
NUT201 Food and Health
NUT220 Food Intake Analysis and Meal Planning
NUT305 Nutrition for Disease Prevention
NUT301 Community and Public Health
NUT306 Menu Planning for the Community

Public Health Minor

ENM308 The Challenge of Sustainable Development
HIP302 Understanding Healthy Communities
HIP303 Promoting Healthy Communities
HSM202 The Dynamics of Health Care Practice
LES301 Health Policy and Program Development
SCI202 Sustainable Practices
SPE211 Foundations in Social Policy

For the award of a named Minor, students must select between four to six subjects from the approved list. Students can only replace a subject in a Minor, with written approval from the Course Director and/or Discipline Leader.

Electives: students must complete a minimum of 32 points four (4) standard subjects at level 3 or above to be eligible to graduate with the degree.

Key Subjects
BMS161 Health and the Human Body  Cells, Immunity & Musculoskeletal
BMS162 Health and the Human Body II - Systemic Human Physiology
BMS171 Introduction to Functional Human Anatomy
BMS172 Functional Anatomy of the Vertebral Column, Pelvic Girdle, & Lower Limb
HIP203 Health and Development Through the Lifespan
HIP213 Rehabilitation Principles and Contexts

Enrolment Pattern

Commencing Session One
By Full-Time Study

Year 1, Session 1
BMS161 Health and the Human Body  Cells, Immunity & Musculoskeletal
BMS171 Introduction to Functional Human Anatomy
HIP100 Introduction to Health & Rehabilitation
IKC100 Indigenous Health

Year 1, Session 2
BMS162 Health and the Human Body II - Systemic Human Physiology
BMS172 Functional Anatomy of the Vertebral Column, Pelvic Girdle, & Lower Limb
HIP112 Communication for Health Practice
PSY111 Foundations of Psychology for Health and Human Services

Students may exit at this point with a Diploma in Health and Rehabilitation Science

Year 2, Session 1
BMS271 Functional Anatomy of the Head, Neck, Pectoral Girdle, & Upper Limb
BMS263 Pharmacology for Allied Health Professionals
HIP203 Health and Development through the Lifespan
HIP202 Research for Health Practice

Year 2, Session 2
BMS255 Neuroscience for Health Practice
BMS256 Exercise Science for Health Practice
HIP213 Rehabilitation Principles and Contexts
SOC108 Sociology of Health and Health Care OR BMS208 Human Nutrition (for Nutrition Minor only)

Students may exit at this point with an Associate Degree in Health and Rehabilitation Science

Year 3, Session 1
HIP301 Complex Cases in Rehabilitation (16 points) (commenced)
HIP302 Understanding Healthy Communities OR Elective
STA201 (Scientific Statistics) OR Elective
Elective

Year 3, Session 2
HIP301 Complex Cases in Rehabilitation (16 points) (completed)
HIP303 Promoting Healthy Communities OR Elective
Elective OR SOC108 Sociology of Health (for Nutrition Minor only)
Elective

PLEASE NOTE: For the award of a named Minor, students must select between four to six subjects from the approved list. Students can only replace a subject in a Minor, with written approval from the Course Director and/or Discipline Leader.

Electives: students must complete a minimum of 32 points four (4) standard subjects at level 3 or above to be eligible to graduate with the degree.

Minors
The minors offered at CSU include Disability; Exercise Science; Gerontology; Nutrition; Public Health.

Disability Minor

HIP302 Understanding Healthy Communities
WEL206 Facilitating Positive Behaviours
WEL217 Social Dimensions of Disability
WEL218 Developing Cross Cultural Competencies
WEL228 Disability Issues for Families
WEL418 Case Management

Exercise Science Minor

BMS257 Movement Science OR EHR218 Biomechanics
EHR211 Functional Anatomy & Human Performance
EHR214 Skill Acquisition
EHR221 Conditioning & Physical Activity
EHR225 Growth, Motor Development & Ageing
EHR331 Exercise, Health & Disease
EHR332 Nutrition for Health & Performance

Gerontology Minor

GER102 Gerontology Theory and Research
GER204 Introduction to Ageing
GER402 Ageing Bodies, Ageing Minds
PSY216 Psychology of Ageing
WEL206 Facilitating Positive Behaviours
WEL418 Case Management

Nutrition Minor

BMS208 Human Nutrition
EHR332 Nutrition for Health & Performance
NUT201 Food and Health
NUT220 Food Intake Analysis and Meal Planning
NUT305 Nutrition for Disease Prevention
NUT301 Community and Public Health
NUT306 Menu Planning for the Community

Public Health Minor

ENM308 The Challenge of Sustainable Development
HIP302 Understanding Healthy Communities
HIP303 Promoting Healthy Communities
HSM202 The Dynamics of Health Care Practice
LES301 Health Policy and Program Development
SCI202 Sustainable Practices
SPE211 Foundations in Social Policy


Commencing Session One
By Part-Time Online Education Study

Year 1, Session 1
BMS161 Health and the Human Body  Cells, Immunity & Musculoskeletal
HIP100 Introduction to Health & Rehabilitation

Year 1, Session 2
BMS162 Health and the Human Body II - Systemic Human Physiology
HIP112 Communication for Health Practice

Year 2, Session 1
BMS171 Introduction to Functional Human Anatomy
IKC100 Indigenous Health

Year 2, Session 2
BMS172 Functional Anatomy of the Vertebral Column, Pelvic Girdle, & Lower Limb
PSY111 Foundations of Psychology for Health and Human Services

Students may exit at this point with a Diploma in Health and Rehabilitation Science

Year 3, Session 1
BMS263 Pharmacology for Allied Health Professionals
BMS271 Functional Anatomy of the Head, Neck, Pectoral Girdle, & Upper Limb

Year 3, Session 2
BMS255 Neuroscience for Health Practice
BMS256 Exercise Science for Health Practice

Year 4, Session 1
HIP201 Health & Rehabilitation Through the Lifespan (16 points) (commenced)
HIP202 Research for Health Practice

Year 4, Session 2
HIP201 Health & Rehabilitation Through the Lifespan (16 points) (completed)
SOC108 Sociology of Health and Health Care OR BMS208 Human Nutrition (for Nutrition Minor only)

Students may exit at this point with an Associate Degree in Health and Rehabilitation Science

Year 5, Session 1
HIP301 Complex Cases in Rehabilitation (16 points) (commenced) OR Elective
STA201 (Scientific Statistics) OR Elective

Year 5, Session 2
HIP301 Complex Cases in Rehabilitation (16 points) (completed) OR Elective
Elective OR SOC108 Sociology of Health (for Nutrition minor only)

Year 6, Session 1
HIP302 Understanding Healthy Communities OR Elective
Elective

Year 6, Session 2
HIP303 Promoting Healthy Communities OR Elective
Elective

PLEASE NOTE: For the award of a named Minor, students must select between four to six subjects from the approved list. Students can only replace a subject in a Minor, with written approval from the Course Director and/or Discipline Leader.

Electives: students must complete a minimum of 32 points four (4) standard subjects at level 3 or above to be eligible to graduate with the degree.

Commencing Session Two

Students choosing to commence study in session two may complete the following subjects prior to progressing to the standard full-time or part-time enrolment pattern.

Year 1, Session 2
HIP112 Communication for Health Practice
PSY111 Foundations of Psychology for Health and Human Services

Year 1 Session 3
IKC100 Indigenous Health

Commencing Session Three

Students choosing to commence study in session three may complete the following subjects prior to progressing to the standard full-time or part-time enrolment pattern.

Please note that session 3 enrolment is limited to Year 1 due to the small number of subjects available in session 3.

Year 1, Session 3
IKC100 Indigenous Health
PSY111 Foundations of Psychology for Health and Human Services

Workplace Learning

Please note that the following subjects may contain a Workplace Learning component. Further details for Workplace Learning requirements are located via the subject page

HIP100 Introduction to Health and Rehabilitation
HIP213 Rehabilitation Principles and Contexts
HIP301 Complex Cases in Rehabilitation
NUT306 Menu Planning for the Community

Residential School

Please note that the following subjects may contain a Residential School component. Further details of Residential School requirements are located via the subject page

BMS161 Health and the Human body: cells, immunity and musculoskeletal system
BMS171 Introduction to Functional Human Anatomy
BMS172 Functional Anatomy of the Vertebral Column, Pelvic Girdle and Lower Limb
BMS256 Exercise Science for Health Practice
BMS271 Functional Anatomy of the Head, Neck, Pectoral Girdle and Upper Limb
EHR211 Functional Anatomy & Human Performance
EHR214 Skill Acquisition
EHR221 Exercise for Health & Fitness

Enrolled students can find further information about CSU Residential Schools via at About Residential School

Professional Accreditation

The course has no accreditation with any professional organisation.

Contact

For further information about courses and subjects outlined in the CSU handbook please contact:

Current students

Future students

The information contained in the CSU Handbook was accurate at the date of publication: September 2019. The University reserves the right to vary the information at any time without notice.

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