ASC308 Contemporary and Emerging Issues in Animal Science (8)

This subject is the capstone subject for all students in the final year of the Bachelor of Animal Science degree, allowing for a culmination of experiences, and the synthesis and application of knowledge from across the various aspects of Animal Science studied in the preceding years. In this subject, students will investigate and evaluate contemporary local and global influences on animal production and wildlife conservation, including major emerging issues affecting policy and practice within the animal science sphere. Students will also gain an appreciation of the complexities of the interrelationships between humans, animal production and wildlife conservation, including the impacts of differing human cultural values and beliefs. Through the use of workshops and discussion groups, individual involvement and engagement with the subject matter will be fostered. These activities will provide students with an opportunity for discussion, debate, problem solving and thinking about the future. This subject also includes reflection and assessment of work place learning undertaken prior to enrolment in this subject.

No offerings have been identified for this subject in 2020.

Where differences exist between the Handbook and the SAL, the SAL should be taken as containing the correct subject offering details.

Subject Information

Grading System

HD/FL

Duration

Two sessions

School

School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences

Enrolment Restrictions

Bachelor of Animal Science
Bachelor of Animal Science (Honours)

Assumed Knowledge

ASC110 Introduction to Animal Science OR ASC100 Introduction to Animal Science; BIO100 Concepts of Biology; ASC225 Assessment of Animal Welfare; ASC306 Applied Animal Pharmacology

Subject Relationships

ASC307 ASC308 replaces ASC307

Incompatible Subjects

ASC307

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this subject, students should:
  • be able to critically discuss and appraise the complexity of, and interrelationships between environmental, ethical, cultural and social issues relevant to the animal sciences and their incorporation into decision making;
  • be able to investigate and evaluate complex issues through innovative and critical use of a variety of available data sources, and the scientific literature, and then synthesise the information to form and defend a cogent argument supporting a viewpoint on these issues;
  • be able to develop and explain strategies or solutions applicable to animal enterprises that address challenges identified in the relevant industries;
  • be able to work effectively and with initiative both independently and as part of a team to meet individual, team or class outcomes;
  • be able to summarise, justify and communicate information effectively in a style appropriate to the audience;
  • be able to critically evaluate one's own ideas and those of peers; and
  • be able to prepare and present a workplace learning portfolio that encompasses experiences, skills, knowledge, capabilities and reflective practice.

Syllabus

This subject will cover the following topics:
  • Current and emerging environmental, economic, political and cultural changes and issues that have implications for animal production and biodiversity, potentially including but not limited to:
  • - Climate change
  • - Globalisation
  • - Fossil fuel reserves
  • - Competition for resources (deforestation, water)
  • - Loss of biodiversity
  • - Sustainability
  • - Food security, safety and demand for animal protein
  • - Consumer preferences and perceptions
  • - Animal rights and liberation
  • - Zoonotic diseases
  • Scientific frameworks, principles of good science, abductive science, dissemination of research findings, summaries, position statements and press/media releases
  • Critical analysis of specific topics relating to animal production, conservation biology and wildlife management
  • Development of workplace learning portfolio
  • Effective communication skills for diverse audiences and controversial topics
  • Policy vs practice - what's the difference and how can policy be shaped?
  • Problems and challenges faced by animal science industries

Workplace Learning

This subject contains a 30 days Compulsory Workplace Learning component.

All students are required to complete 30 days (7 h/d) of workplace learning during the non-teaching periods of the first three years of the Bachelor of Animal Science course. All students must complete a minimum of 10 days experience at any one enterprise, and they should aim to attend at least two enterpriises. The enterprises must be approved by the Subject Coordinator or the Animal Husbandry Extra Mural Studies Coordinator or their nominee. The enterprises may include, but are not limited to those involved with commercial animal production of any type, conservation biology and wildlife, domestic animals and pets, zoological parks and agricultural or biomedical research. Students need to complete workplace learning in more than one of these classes of enterprise and will be encouraged to gain as wide a diversity of experience as possible.

Workplace Learning contributes to the development of the Subject's Learning Outcomes, specifically:
to be able to develop and explain strategies or solutions applicable to animal enterprises that address challenges identified in the relevant industries;
to be able to work effectively and with initiative both independently and as part of a team to meet individual, team or class outcomes;
to be able to summarise, justify and communicate information effectively in a style appropriate to the audience;
to be able to critically evaluate one's own ideas and those of peers; and
to be able to prepare and present a workplace learning portfolio that encompasses experiences, skills, knowledge, capabilities and reflective practice.

Special Resources

Students must arrange their own transport to and accommodation at the Animal Science Extra Mural Studies placements of their choice.

The information contained in the CSU Handbook was accurate at the date of publication: January 2020. The University reserves the right to vary the information at any time without notice.

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