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BIO327 Wildlife Ecology and Management (16)

Abstract

In a world of increasing human impact, effective wildlife management is crucial for the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity. In this subject, students build on their existing ecological knowledge to learn ecological principles specifically relating to wildlife and how these principles underpin wildlife management strategies. A strong emphasis is placed on factors such as competition and predation in a management context. The population dynamics of wildlife, sustainable harvesting and survey techniques are discussed in detail and learnt through a field trip. Students completing this subject have the ability to develop wildlife management strategies for the control, sustainable use, or recovery of species and can apply adaptive management principles to wildlife management problems.

+ Subject Availability Modes and Location

Session 2
Online*Albury-Wodonga Campus
On CampusAlbury-Wodonga Campus
*This subject offering contains a residential school. Please view following information for further details.
Continuing students should consult the SAL for current offering details: BIO327
Where differences exist between the Handbook and the SAL, the SAL should be taken as containing the correct subject offering details.

Subject information

Duration Grading System School:
One sessionHD/FLSchool of Environmental Sciences

Assumed Knowledge

BIO112

Enrolment restrictions

Students may not enrol in this subject if they have completed either or both BIO261 and/or BIO361.
Incompatible subject(s)
BIO261 BIO361

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this subject, students should:
  • have an in-depth understanding of the key concepts and principles of wildlife ecology and management
  • have a critical understanding of the factors influencing wildlife distribution and abundance
  • have a critical understanding of wildlife population dynamics and modelling
  • have a critical understanding of the theoretical aspects of threatened species management, wildlife control, and sustainable use of wildlife
  • have specialised skills in the design and implementation of wildlife surveys
  • be able to apply appropriate scientific methods to the study of wildlife ecology and management
  • be able to exercise critical thinking and sound judgement to develop wildlife management strategies for the control, sustainable use, or recovery of species
  • be able to apply adaptive management principles to wildlife management problems

Syllabus

The subject will cover the following topics:
  • 1. Definitions and principles of wildlife ecology and management
  • 2. The scientific methods that underpin the study of wildlife, including appropriate experimental design and interpretation of results
  • 3. Evolution and taxonomy of Australian wildlife
  • 4. Important ecological principles for understanding wildlife populations, foraging, competition, predation, behaviour and dispersal
  • 5. Population dynamics, including metapopulations, modelling, extinction processes and sustained yields
  • 6. Wildlife harvesting and control, including pest management, biological control and sustainable use of wildlife
  • 7. Theoretical and practical application of various wildlife survey techniques
  • 8. Habitat management
  • 9. Managing threatened species, including captive breeding, translocation and reintroduction principles
  • 10. Adaptive management and whole ecosystem management

Residential School

This subject contains a compulsory 5 day residential school. Students completing this subject have specialised skills in the design and implementation of wildlife surveys
and are able to apply appropriate scientific methods to the study of wildlife ecology and management. The focus of the residential school is to teach students the practical experience in various wildlife survey techniques and the application of scientific principles to wildlife ecology and management. The activities undertaken revolve around the trapping and recording of various fauna groups in a local conservation reserve.

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The information contained in the 2018 CSU Handbook was accurate at the date of publication: 24 November 2017. The University reserves the right to vary the information at any time without notice.