Charles Sturt University
Charles Sturt University

Dr Andrew Clark

Dr Andrew Clark

PhD

Dr Andrew Clark was raised in Dunnstown and attended St Patrick's College in Ballarat.  He attended The University of Melbourne, completing his Bachelor of Science (Hon.) in 1996.  Andrew began his PhD in chemistry at The University of Melbourne in 1997 during which time he was a visiting researcher at the Wagga Wagga Campus of Charles Sturt University (1998). 

After completing his PhD in 2001, Andrew joined Charles Sturt University as a Post Doctorate Fellow.  His research involved investigations into the mechanism of oxidative browing of white wine as mediated by copper (II) and ascorbic acid.  Part of this research was performed with the INRA in Montpellier, France. 

In 2003 Andrew was appointed as Lecturer in the School of Wine and Food Sciences and was coordinator of the Bachelor of Applied Science (Wine Science) course from 2006 to 2010.  In 2008, Andrew became a Senior Lecturer.

Andrew is interested in various topics associated with wine oxidation and general wine chemistry.

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Specialisation: Wine Chemistry

Focus Area: Wine oxidation, bottle aging, wine phenolic compounds, metal ions

The consumption of oxygen by wine is a complex process. Research has been conducted to ascertain the reaction mechanisms involved in the consumption of oxygen by wine and also the mechanisms involved in the production of parameters that are detrimental to the flavour of white wine (i.e., non-beneficial colour and aroma formation). The efficiency of complementary antioxidants to sulfur dioxide has been investigated, including the use of ascorbic acid, erythorbic acid and glutathione. A tool has also been developed to determine the different forms of copper in wine, a catalyst of wine oxidation, and how the forms change during the oxidation of wine. The impact of light on the oxidative and/or reductive spoilage of wine is currently being investigated. This research provides winemakers further knowledge on white wine oxidation, and will allow an improved shelf life of white wine for a given amount of sulfur dioxide.

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Clark, A.C., Grant-Preece, P., Cleghorn, N. & Scollary, G.R. (2015). Copper(II) addition to white wines containing hydrogen sulfide: residual copper concentration and activity. Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research. 21: 30-39.

Wallington, N., Clark, A.C., Barril, C., Prenzler, P.D. & Scollary, G.R. (2013). The decay of ascorbic acid in a model wine system at low oxygen concentration. Food Chemistry. 141: 3139-3146.

Grant-Preece, P., Fang, H., Schmidtke, L.M. & Clark, A.C. (2013). Sensorially important aldehyde production from amino acids in model wine systems: Impact of ascorbic acid, erythrobic acid, glutathione and SO2. Food Chemistry. 141: 304-312.

Bouzanquet, Q., Barril,  C., Clark, A.C., Dias, D.A. & Scollary, G.R. (2012) A novel glutathione-hydroxycinnamic acid product generated in oxidative wine conditions. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 60: 12186-12195.

Clark, A.C., Dias, D.A., Smith, T.A., Ghiggino, K.P. & Scollary, G.R. (2011) Iron(III) tartrate as a potential precursor of light-induced oxidative degradation of white wine: studies in a model wine system. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 59: 3575-3581.

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The compositional and sensory impact of copper fining on bottle aging of Riesling

Copper(II), generally added as copper(II) sulfate, is utilised for the removal of sulfidic-off odours in wine production. The impact on elevated residual copper concentrations on the bottle aging of specific wine varieties is not currently understood. The results of this project demonstrate that high residual concentrations of copper can have a large impact on the composition of non-protein stabilised Riesling wine post packaging.

Presentation on above

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