Charles Sturt University
Charles Sturt University

Associate Professor Greg Dunn

Associate Professor Greg Dunn

BSc., (Hons 1), PhD - Plant Physiology (U MLB)

Associate Professor Gregory Dunn is Deputy Director of the National Grape and Wine Industry Centre, Wagga Wagga and Research Leader (Viticulture) DPI NSW. He completed his PhD in 1991 (The University of Melbourne) after which he took up a post-doctoral fellowship researching tree water use and forest hydrology.  From 1993 until 1997 Greg was based at the Queensland Forest Research Institute where he was responsible for the State's native forest and plantation forest silviculture research programs.  In 1997 he returned to Victoria to work on various yield forecasting and yield regulation projects in Viticulture for DPI Victoria. From 2005 until 2010 Greg was Associate Professor (Viticulture) and CR Roper Fellow in Agricultural Science at The University of Melbourne. He has spent the last 18 years involved in viticultural research, extension, training and post-graduate and undergraduate teaching, first for DPI Victoria and then for The University of Melbourne. Greg is also Deputy Editor for The Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research.

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Specialisation: Grapevine Physiology

Focus area: Yield Forecasting, Yield Management, Reproductive Biology, Extension

The performance of the Australian wine industry is sensitive to mismatches between expected and actual grape intake. These mismatches generate inefficiencies that result in foregone revenue and extra costs in vineyards, wineries and distribution chains. Winery intake planners seek accurate estimates of likely grape production from vineyard managers at various stages throughout the season in advance of harvest. However, inaccurate forecasts have been a source of irritation, discontent and conflict throughout the Australian wine industry. Furthermore, major producers and purchasers of grapes are increasingly stipulating that particular yield targets should be met, in the belief that this will improve and maintain wine quality. We will seek to continue research to develop improved methods to forecast and manage vineyard and regional yields. Improved yield management is based on an improved understanding of how the environmental, management and plant factors combine to drive the development of yield potential and its realisation.

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Webb, L., Dunn, G.M. and Barlow, E.W.R. (2010) Winegrapes. In: Adapting Agriculture to Climate Change, eds Chris Stokes and mark Howden CSIRO Publishing, pp. 101-118.

Watt, A.M., Dunn, G.M., May, P., Crawford, S. and Barlow, E.W.R. (2008) Development of inflorescence primordia in Vitis vinifera L. cv. Chardonnay from hot and cool climates. Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research 14: 46-53.

Dunn, G.M. and Martin, S.R. (2007).  A functional association in Vitis vinifera L. cv. Cabernet Sauvignon between the extent of primary branching and the number of flowers formed per inflorescence. Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research 13: 95-100.

Dunn, G.M. (2006) Regulating yield in vineyards. Australian Viticulture, 10: 40-44.

Dunstone, R.J,  Dunn, G.M.,  Martin, S.R.,  Whiting, J.R. and  Mahoney, C. (2005) Realistic considerations for technology adoption – a wine industry example. Acta Horticulturae 694: 351-355.

Dunn, G.M., Martin, S.R. and Petrie, P.R. (2005) Managing yield variation in vineyards. Paper published in Proceedings of the Australian Wine Industry Technical Conference held 24-29 July 2004, Melbourne, Australia p 51-56.

O'Connell, M.G., Goodwin, I. and Dunn, G.M. (2005). Towards a better understanding of crop water requirement in orchards: a case study from the Goulburn Valley. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture 46: 405-412.

Dunn, G.M. (2005). Factors that control flower formation in grapevines. Proceedings of the ASVO Seminar Series: Transforming Flowers to Fruit. Mildura, Victoria, July 2005 pp. 7-10.

Krstic, M.P., Clingeleffer, P.R., Dunn, G.M., Martin, S.R and Petrie, P.R. (2005). Grapevine growth and reproduction: an overview. Proceedings of the ASVO Seminar Series: Transforming Flowers to Fruit. Mildura, Victoria, July 2005 pp. 11-18.

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