Charles Sturt University
Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation

Associate Professor Gaye Krebs

Associate Professor Gaye Krebs

BAppSc (Hons)(QAC), PhD(UNE)

  • Position
    Associate Professor, Animal nutrition and metabolism, School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
  • Campus
    campus
  • Location
    Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga
  • Phone/Fax
    work02 6933 2382, Fax: 02 6933 2991
  • Email

Associate Professor Krebs completed a BAppSc (Rural Technology - Hon) at Queensland Agricultural College before undertaking PhD research through the University of New England, investigating interchange between microbial pools within the rumen.

On meeting PhD requirements, Associate Professor Krebs was appointed Lecturer in the Department of Agriculture at Papua New Guinea University of Technology. Whilst there she was involved in teaching, but was also nutrition consultant to South Pacific Brewery Ltd, (PNG) and Associated Mills, Ltd. Lae (PNG) and was Chair of the Organising Committee for the Inaugural Conference of the PNG Society of Animal Production, 20-23 June 1988.

Associate Professor Krebs returned to Australia in 1989 and was employed as Husbandry Officer (Division II), Sheep and Wool Branch, Queensland Department of Primary Industries until she took up a position first as Lecturer, then Senior Lecturer with Curtin University of Technology.

Associate Professor Krebs joined the Staff of Charles Sturt University in 2008 as Senior Lecturer in the School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences.

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Research

  • Variations in digestive efficiency between woolled and non-woolled sheeep breeds and goats.
  • Effects of zinc supplementation on the growth and sexual development of Merino ram lambs.
  • Effects of transitional feeding of dairy cows on colostrum quality and subsequent calf health.
  • Variations in the composition and quality of the diet of Damara sheep grazing in the southern rangelands of Western Australia during a drought.
  • Effects of rotational versus continuous grazing management on diet selection and quality of Merino ewes grazing native pastures in the Central Tablelands of New South Wales.

Teaching

Subject areas currently taught by Associate Professor Krebs include Animal Structure and Function and Advanced Animal Nutrition and Biochemistry.

Associate Professor Krebs also has teaching involvement in Animal Anatomy and Physiology, Introductory Equine Management, Equine Nutrition, Animal Nutrition and as a facilitator for problem based learning within the veterinary science program.

Associate Professor Krebs has been actively involved in supervision of Honours, Masters and PhD students, and is currently supervising two PhD and a Masters student plus several Animal Science and Veterinary Science honours students.

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McCafferty PB, Krebs GL, Mahipala K, Ho KH & Dods K (2011). Utilising NIRS and DNA technologies to manage rangeland sustainability, 105 p, RIRDC Publication No. 11/003, Rural Industries Research & Development Corporation, Kingston, ACT.

Ho KW, Krebs GL, McCafferty P, van Wyngaarden S & Addison J (2010). 'Using faecal DNA to determine consumption by kangaroos of plants considered palatable to sheep', Animals, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 282-288.

Kumara Mahipala MBP, Krebs GL, McCafferty P, Naumovski T, Dods K & Stephens R (2010). 'Predicting the quality of browse-containing diets fed to sheep using faecal near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy', Animal Production Science vol. 50, pp. 925-930.

Kumara Mahipala MBP, Krebs GL, McCafferty P, Dods K & Suriyagoda BMLDB (2009). 'Faecal indices to predict organic matter digestibility, short chain fatty acid production and metabolizable energy content of browse-containing sheep diets', Animal Feed Science and Technology vol. 154, no. 1-2, pp. 68-75.

Kumara Mahipala MBP, Krebs GL, McCafferty P & Gunaratne LHP (2009). 'Chemical composition, biological effects of tannin and in-vitro nutritive value of selected browse species, grown in the West Australian Mediterranean environment', Animal Feed Science and Technology, vol. 153, pp. 203-215.

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