Charles Sturt University
Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation

Miss Alice Bunyan

Miss Alice Bunyan

Epidemiology of Haemonchus contortus in Australia

Epidemiology of Haemonchus contortus in Australia

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Haemonchus contortus (barber’s pole worm) is an extremely significant component of the approximately 400 million dollar annual cost of sheep nematodes to the Australian sheep industry. Barber’s pole worm infestation can cause anaemia, exercise intolerance and even mortality of sheep. Typically this parasite is found in summer rainfall environments, and is endemic in parts of northern NSW and southern Queensland. More recently sporadic outbreaks have occurred in other parts of Australia, including southern NSW, and these have been thought to be associated with unusually wet summer months. Significant worm burdens have also been unexpectedly measured in these regions during colder, winter months.

This project will investigate the epidemiology of barber’s pole worm in less ‘traditional’ regions, such as southern NSW, and compare local barber’s pole worm strains with those from other regions, including via molecular testing in collaboration with CSIRO. Investigation of farmer treatment and other management of barber’s pole, including anthelmintic resistance strains, will also shed light on sustainable and effective sheep worm control in general.

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Dr Rob Woodgate (CSU), Dr Shokoofeh Shamsi (CSU), Dr Peter Hunt (CSIRO), Dr Stephen Love (NSW DPI)

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University Research Centre (URC)  – Graham Centre

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