ILWS - Charles Sturt University
ILWS - Charles Sturt University

In the News

Members of the Institute engage with the media considerably and are often called upon to provide expert advice and commentary on important issues affecting rural and regional Australia.

Engaging with the media also provides the opportunity for our researchers to engage with the wider community and to promote and publicise their research and findings.

All media releases involving ILWS researchers are issued as CSU Media Releases. Our researchers engage with both traditional media (print, radio and TV) as well as social and on-line media.

In the News 2019 is a compilation of media coverage received by ILWS members from information provided by CSU Media and the news monitoring services it uses.

Our researchers also regularly write Opinion Pieces and Articles for on-line news services such as The Conversation.

2019

Feral cat cull: why the 2 million target is on scientifically shaky ground

Feral Cat CullAssociate Professor Dale Nimmo et al write that the Australian government’s target of killing 2 million feral cats by 2020 attracted significant public interest and media attention when it was unveiled in 2015. But in their new research, published Feb 19 in Conservation Letters, they explain why it has a shaky scientific foundation in The Conversation, February 20.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: An Eightieth Anniversary Reflection

Reflection - Universal declaration of human rightsThe Universal Declaration’s inference that everybody is entitled to share public sovereignty exists alongside the UNDRIPs presumption that there is also an extant independent indigenous sovereignty. Recognising co-existence of different though overlapping spheres of authority provides a possible path towards substantive human equality for indigenous peoples as much as for anybody else, writes Associate Prof Dominic O'Sullivan, in The Oxford Human Rights Hub, February 11.

The crown is Māori too - citizenship, sovereignty, and the Treaty of Waitangi  

The Conversation - The crown is Maori tooWhat is the Crown, what is sovereignty and how do these relate to citizenship as it has developed from the British subjecthood that the treaty promised? asks Associate Professor Dominic O'Sullivan in The Conversation, February 8.

We asked five experts: is it safe to run while pregnant?

The Conversation - Running while pregnantMany women love the alone time pounding the pavement for a nice run out in nature, but is this too strenuous? We asked five experts, including the Institute's Associate Professor Rylee Dionigi, if it’s safe to run while pregnant, The Conversation, January 28.

A good plan to help Darling River fish recover exists, so let’s get on with it

The Conversation - Darling River Fish PlanDr Lee Baumgartner and Professor Max Finlayson continue the Institute’s input into discussions around the fish kill in the Darling River and remind us the Native Fish Strategy lays out a plan for helping the basin’s fish communities recover from where they are now, at 10% of pre-European levels (0% in some parts), back to 60% over 50 years in The Conversation, January 21.

2018

Lessons from New Zealand on the 'duty to consult' First Nations

The Convesation - Lessons from New ZealandThe complexities and limits of the Crown's "duty to consult" over decisions affecting First Nations' rights is discussed in A/Prof Dominic O'Sullivan's latest Conversation article, November 30.

For the first time we've looked at every threatened bird in Australia side-by-side

The  Conversation - Endangered birdsHow do you measure the success of conservation efforts? Professor Dave Watson and 17 colleagues from a dozen Australian universities along with scientists and private researchers have created a metrics of progress to understand how to manage threats of different intensity and how well that management has been implemented, they describe their analysis of Australian birds in this new article in The Conversation, November 27.

Bainimarama wins again in Fiji, helped by muzzling the media, unions and the church

The Conversation - Fijian election winAssociate Professor Dominic O’Sullivan’s analysis of the results of the Fijian election argues that restrictions on free speech mean that there is no way of testing popular Fijian opinion.  He says “It may have been a free vote. But the conditions for an informed vote – scrutiny and robust debate - were not present” in his piece appearing in The Conversation, November 20.

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