ILWS - Charles Sturt University
ILWS - Charles Sturt University

Identifying low risk climate change mitigation and adaptation in catchment management while avoiding unintended consequences (2012-2013)

Strategic Research Area

Sustainable Water

Funding

National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility, $100,000

Investigators/ Researchers

Dr Anna Lukasiewicz (post-doc), Prof Max Finlayson, ILWS & Dr Jamie Pittock, ANU

Description

Inherent in every adaptation measure are risks, costs and benefits. A challenge for decision makers is how to choose adaptations that reduce risks from climate change impacts and are overwhelmingly beneficial. This project focuses on several catchments in the Murray-Darling Basin as an example for testing a method for more integrative climate change adaptation that increases resilience and avoids maladaptation.

The project involved a comprehensive literature review, semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders and four workshops with the project partners.  Ovens River

In this project, the research team showed how systemic climate change adaptation planning can better consider risks, costs and benefits to inform choice of measures. A 'Climate Change Adaptation Catchment Assessment Framework' (CCA CAF) was also developed as a planning tool for regional management bodies in southern Australia to assess climate change adaptation.

Pic on right :Ovens, River, VIC. © J Pittock, 2008

Outputs

  1. Lukasiewicz, A, Finlayson, CM, Pittock, J 2013 Identifying low risk climate change adaptation in catchment management while avoiding unintended consequences, National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility, Gold Coast, pp.103.
  2. Lukasiewicz, A., Finlayson, C. M., & Pittock, J. 2012. Identifying low-risk adaptation: A case study of the Goulburn Broken Catchment, Institute for Land, Water and Society Report no. 72, Albury, Australia, pp.50.
  3. Lukasiewicz, A., Finlayson, C. M., & Pittock, J. 2012. Identifying low-risk adaptation: A case study of the North East Catchment, Institute for Land, Water and Society. Report no. 73, Albury, Australia, pp.33
  4. Lukasiewicz, A., Finlayson, C. M., & Pittock, J. 2012. Identifying low-risk adaptation: A case study of the Murray Catchment, Institute for Land, Water and Society Report no. 74, Albury, Australia, pp.50.
  5. Lukasiewicz, A., Finlayson, C. M., & Pittock, J. 2012. Identifying low-risk adaptation: A case study of the Lachlan Catchment, Institute for Land, Water and Society Report no. 75, Albury, Australia, pp.50.
  6. Lukasiewicz, A., Finlayson, C. M., & Pittock, J. 2013. Incorporating climate change adaptation into catchment management: A user guide. Report No. 76, Albury, Australia, pp.35.
  7. Presentation at RiverSymposium Brisbane 23-26 September 2013 "Dodging magic bullets: Adapting catchment management for the future" Anna Lukasiewicz,  Jamie Pittock,  Max Finlayson PDF
  8. Lukasiewicz, A., Finlayson, C. M., & Pittock, J. 2013. Identifying low risk climate change adaptation in catchment management while avoiding unintended consequences, National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility, Gold Coast, Australia. Synthesis and Integrative Research Final report

Outcomes

The CCA CAF and its associated concepts have been presented in climate change-related workshops, conferences and seminars around Australia (in Melbourne, Canberra, Sydney and Brisbane) and overseas (at a seminar organised by the International Institute for Global Health in Malaysia).

The Climate Change Adaptation Catchment Assessment Framework was developed and tested as a planning tool aimed at catchment-level NRM managers. The tool has proved helpful to CMA project officers during a review of NSW Catchment Action Plans, as it allowed the incorporation of climate change adaptation considerations into management activities within the CMAs' water programs.

A CCA CAF User Guide has been developed to offer step-by-step instructions and necessary information for managers to apply the CCA CAF in their NRM institution.

CONTACT
Dr Anna Lukasiewicz
email

September 2013