PKM397 Heritage Site Management (16)

Heritage Site Management provides an overview of the practice and philosophy of cultural heritage site management with respect to both Indigenous Australian and European heritage places. The subject examines the nature of hazards impacting on heritage places (environmental decay, natural disasters, visitors) and the techniques and management strategies required to manage them. It builds on a student's basic understanding of cultural heritage and teaches sound management techniques in conserving heritage. This subject has a residential school students involving a field that examines the nature of hazards impacting on heritage places. Students completing this subject have the skills to implement a site management process and to develop a site management plan.

Availability

* Offering has a residential school. Please view following information for further details.

Session 1 (30)
Online *
Albury-Wodonga Campus

Continuing students should consult the SAL for current offering details: PKM397. Where differences exist between the Handbook and the SAL, the SAL should be taken as containing the correct subject offering details.

Subject Information

Grading System

HD/FL

Duration

One session

School

School of Environmental Sciences

Enrolment Restrictions

none

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this subject, students should:
  • have an in-depth understanding the relationship people from diverse backgrounds (For example. European, Ethnic, Indigenous backgrounds) have with heritage
  • have an in-depth understanding of appropriate site management processes (e.g. consultation protocols for Indigenous peoples)
  • have an in-depth understanding of the impact of environmental decay, natural disasters, and visitors on heritage sites
  • have an understanding of the role of, and need for, expert advice in solving some physical conservation problems. and the conservation measures required
  • be able to make sound judgements regarding the mitigation measures required to manage the impact of environmental decay, natural disasters, and visitors on heritage sites
  • have an ability to implement a site management process and to develop a site management plan including the protocols and processes to involve the local community (e.g the local Indigenous custodians)

Syllabus

This subject will cover the following topics:
  • module 1: cultural resource revisited- revising the issues of culture and heritage
  • module 2: site management plans - the need for and general structure of a plan
  • module 3: conservation management - the need for conservation, causes and mitigation of decay
  • module 4: disaster management plans- the identification of hazards and their mitigation
  • module 5: visitor management plans

Residential School

This subject contains a 5 day Compulsory Residential School.

The residential school provides an overview of the practice and philosophy of cultural heritage site management with respect to both Indigenous and European heritage places. Students will be taken out into the field to examine the nature of hazards impacting on heritage places (environmental decay, natural disasters, visitors) and the techniques and management strategies required.   For example, it recently involved a trip that looked at various locations in Victoria and New South Wales (Maldon, Bendigo, Swan Hill, Wentworth, Balranald, Lake Mungo, Ivanhoe, Willandra, Homestead, Griffith, Holbrook) and involved the various stakeholders involved in managing these sites. A workbook and reading material for the residential school was distributed at the beginning of the session. The trip focused on conservation issues, techniques and policies, and the cultural resource policy and national parks management issues, drawing on examples of the residential school locations, and on examples visited en route.
 

The information contained in the CSU Handbook was accurate at the date of publication: January 2020. The University reserves the right to vary the information at any time without notice.

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