Charles Sturt University
Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation

Associate Professor Jane Quinn

Associate Professor Jane Quinn

BSc (U Westminster, London), PhD (Edin)

Associate Professor Quinn is co-founder of a multidisciplinary research team investigating the effects and mode of actions of chemicals, both naturally-occurring products and synthetic compounds, causing toxicity to domestic species, plants and the environment. She has worked in large animal research since coming to CSU in 2008, particularly investigating the effects of toxic plants on livestock health. She has an extensive background in basic and applied research including the use of in-vivo and in-vitro model systems to answer complex biological questions such as how naturally occurring compounds cause cell death or dysfunction in animal or human systems. She has a particular interest in naturally-occurring compounds that cause photosensitisation or neurotoxic effects in animals.

Professor Quinn has undertaken commercially sensitive research for animal health companies and is involved in discovery of novel pharmaceuticals for the animal health industries and projects that aim to improve productivity in Australian sheep and beef systems. She is the CSU representative member of the National Strategic Partnership for Animal Welfare and the MLA Strategic Partnership for Animal Welfare, both of which drive change in animal welfare practices in the production industries at a national level in Australia.

Professor Quinn has also been a key driver in the area of veteran’s advocacy around use and effects of the anti-malarial drug mefloquin (Lariam™)for the decade, work which spans a number of continents including Australia, Europe and the US. She works extensively with military veterans, government agencies and Ex-Service Organisations to better understand and treat the  exposed to the neuropsychiatric health conditions that can be caused by this exposure.

Plant interactions research group

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Research

  • Understanding the role of the lolitrem family of neurotoxins in movement disorder in small and large animals models (MLA and EcoDev Victoria)
  • Utilizing bromide to mitigate perennial ryegrass toxicosis in sheep (MLA and CSU)
  • Mitigating production animal stress in feedlot cattle in Australia (MLA MDC)
  • Point-of-Care diagnostics for the Australia feedlot industry (MLA MDC)
  • Developing a treatment for production stress in sheep for Australian producers (Discovery Transformation Fund)
  • Understanding photosensitisation in livestock caused by ingestion of the pasture legume Biserrula pelecinus – aetiology, mitigation and causal compounds (MLA, ANU)
  • Defining prevalence of hepatogenous photosensitisation in Australian livestock – a national and international perspective.
  • Role of the Panicum family of grasses in incidence and severity of photosensitisation in Australian livestock (CSU-funded scholarship)
  • Understanding impacts of weed seed carcass contamination in sheep (CSU-funded scholarship / MLA)

Teaching

Professor Quinn teaches into the Veterinary Biology / Veterinary Science, Animal Science and Equine Science degrees at CSU. She is she Discipline Head of the Anatomy and Physiology teaching team which delivers subject content in anatomy and physiology across all the degree courses in the School of Animal and Veterinary Science. She supervises honours, Masters and PhD students in the areas of veterinary science and neurotoxicology and technologies for novel diagnostics.

Plant interactions research group

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Read more on CSU Research Output

  • Quinn, JC, Chen Y, Hackney B, Tufail M, Loukopoulos P. (2017) Unseasonal acute primary photosensitisation associated with consumption of the pasture legume Biserrula pelecinus in sheep. Submitted BMC  Veterinary Biology. https://bmcvetres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12917-017-1318-7
  • Steroidal saponin toxicity in eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus): a novel clinicopathological presentation of hepatogenous photosensitization. Steventon C, Raidal R, Quinn JC, Peters A. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 2017
  • Tidd N., Michelsen J, Hilbert B, Quinn JC.(2017) Minicircle-mediated gene delivery to canine and equine mesenchymal stem cells. International Journal of Molecular Sciences 18, 819.
    ; doi:10.3390/ijms18040819
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5412403/pdf/ijms-18-00819.pdf
  • Weed Suppression in Australian Cereal Crops and Residues; Case Studies from the Riverina Region in NSW. James Mwendwa J, Brown WB Wu H, Weston PA, Weidenhamer JD, Quinn JC, Weston LA. Crop Protection, 2016.
  • Quinn, JC. (2016) Better approach needed to detect and treat military personnel with adverse effects from mefloquine. Letter.  BMJ 352, i838.
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.i838
  • Quinn, JC. (2016) Mefloquine for prophylaxis in military personnel. Letter. BMJ 351, h5797.  
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.h5797
  • Quinn JC. (2015) Complex membrane channel blockade: A unifying hypothesis for the prodromal and acute neuropsychiatric sequelae resulting from exposure to the antimalarial drug mefloquine. Journal of Parasitology Research.
    http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/368064
  • Pande V, Chousalkar K, Bhanugophan M, Quinn JC. (2015) Super pharmacological levels of calcitriol (1,25-(OH)2D3) inhibits mineral deposition and decreases cell proliferation in a strain dependent manner in chicken mesenchymal stem cells undergoing osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Poultry Science 94(11), 2784-2796.
    https://ps.oxfordjournals.org/content/94/11/2784.full
  • Kessell AE, Boulton J, Krebs GL and Quinn JC. (2015) Acute renal failure due to Amaranthus spp. poisoning in lambs. Australian Veterinary Journal. 93(6): 208-213.  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/avj.12331/epdf
  • Kessell AE, Ladmore GE, Quinn JC. (2015). An outbreak of primary photosensitisation in lambs secondary to consumption of Biserrula pelecinus. Australian Veterinary Journal. 93(5): 174-178.
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/avj.12318/pdf
  • Alden, R., Hackney, B., Weston LA., Quinn, JC. (2014). Phalaris toxicoses: prevalence, aetiology and toxicology. Journal of Toxins.http://www.avensonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/JTOX-2328-1723-01-0003.pdf
  • Quinn JC, Kessell AE, and Weston L. (2014). Secondary plant products causing photosensitization: their structure, activity and regulation in higher plants and effects in domestic species. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2014; 15(1): 1441–1465.
    DOI: 10.3390/ijms15011441
  • Martin EJ, Nielsen S, Quinn JC. (2014). Client perception of the use of stem cell therapies for the treatment of equine tendon injuries. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science. 34(7): 889-896.  http://www.j-evs.com/article/S0737-0806(14)00094-X/pdf
  • Combs MDA, Rendell D, Reed KFM, Mace WJ, Quinn JC. (2014). Evidence of dehydration and electrolyte disturbances in cases of perennial ryegrass toxicosis in Australian sheep. Australian Veterinary Journal. 92(4): 107-113. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/avj.12161/abstract
  • Manuel MN, Martynoga B, Molinek MD, Quinn JC, Kroemmer C, Mason JO, Price DJ. (2011). The transcription factor Foxg1 regulates telencephalic progenitor proliferation cell autonomously, in part by controlling Pax6 expression levels. Neural Development. 18(6), 9
  • Quinn JC, Molinek M, Nowakowski TJ, Mason JO and Price DJ. (2010). Novel lines of Pax6-/- embryonic stem cells exhibit reduced neurogenic capacity without loss of viability. BMC Neuroscience. 24(11), 26.
    https://neuraldevelopment.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1749-8104-6-9
  • Quinn JC, Molinek M, Mason JO, Price DJ. (2009). Gli3 is required autonomously for dorsal telencephalic cells to adopt appropriate fates during embryonic forebrain development. Developmental Biology 327(1), 204-15. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012160608014255?via%3Dihub
  • Quinn JC, Molinek M, Martynoga BS, Zaki PA, Faedo A, Bulfone A, Hevner RF, West JD, Price DJ.  (2007).  Pax6 controls cerebral cortical cell number by regulating exit from the cell cycle and specifies cortical cell identity by a cell autonomous mechanism. Developmental Biology (1), 50-65.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2384163/
  • Manuel M, Georgala PA, Carr CB, Chanas S, Kleinjan DA, Martynoga B, Mason JO, Molinek M, Pinson J, Pratt T, Quinn JC, Simpson TI, Tyas DA, van Heyningen V, West JD, Price DJ.  (2007). Controlled overexpression of Pax6 in vivo negatively autoregulates the Pax6 locus, causing cell-autonomous defects of late cortical progenitor proliferation with little effect on cortical arealization. Development (3), 545-55.
  • Zaki PA, Collinson JM, Toraiwa J, Simpson TI, Price DJ, Quinn JC. (2006). Penetrance of eye defects in mice heterozygous for mutation of Gli3 is enhanced by heterozygous mutation of Pax6. BMC Developmental Biology 9(6), 46.
    IF: 2.67
  • Quinn JC, Molinek M, Martynoga B, Zaki P, Hevner R, West JD, Price DJ. Pax6 prevents premature progenitor cell differentiation, promotes the development of basal progenitors and cell-autonomously represses ventral identities in the developing neocortex. (2006). International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience, 24: (8) 56. IF: 2.02
  • Georgala PA, Manuel M, Quinn JC, Chanas SA, Molinek MD, West JD & Price DJ.  (2006) Abnormalities of cortical lamination in mice over-expressing PAX6.  FENS Forum Abstracts, Volume 3.
  • Faedo A , Quinn JC, Stoney P, Long JE, Zollo M, Rubenstein JLR, Price DJ, Bulfone A. (2004). Identification and characterization of a novel transcript down regulated in Dlx1/Dlx2 and up regulated in Pax6 mutant telencephalon. Developmental Dynamics 231(3):614-20. IF 2.37
  • Zaki PA, Quinn JC, Price DJ. Mouse models of telencephalic development. Review. (2003). Current Opinion in Genetics and Development 13: 423-37. IF: 8.98
  • Collinson MJ, Quinn JC, Hill RE, West JD. (2003). The roles of Pax6 in the cornea, retina and olfactory epithelium of the developing mouse embryo. Developmental Biology 255:303-12. IF: 4.06
  • Talamillo A, Quinn JC, Collinson MJ, Caric D, Price DJ, West JD, Hill RE. Pax6 regulates regional development and neuronal migration in the cerebral cortex. (2003) Developmental Biology 255:151-63. IF: 4.06
  • Pratt T, Quinn JC, Simpson TI, West JD, Mason JO, Price DJ. (2002). Disruption of early events in thalamocortical tract formation in mice lacking the transcription factors Pax6 or Foxg1. Journal of Neuroscience 22: 8523-8531. IF: 6.34
  • Collinson JM, Quinn JC, Buchanan MA, Kaufman MH, Wedden SE, West JD, Hill RE. (2001). Primary defects in the lens underlie complex anterior segment abnormalities of the Pax6 heterozygous eye. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. Aug 14;98(17):9688-93. IF: 9.67
  • Collinson JM, Quinn JC, Buchanan MA, Kaufman MH, Wedden SE, Hill RE, West JD. Why do small eye (Pax6+/-) mice have small eyes? (2001). Developmental Biology 235: (1), 244-244. IF: 4.06
  • Davidson D, Bard J, Brune R, Burger A, Dubreuil C, Hill W, Kaufman M, Quinn JC, Stark M, Baldock R (1997) The mouse atlas and graphical gene-expression database.  Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology 8:509-517. IF: 6.26
  • Quinn JC, West JD, Kaufman MH (1997) Genetic background effects on dental and other craniofacial abnormalities in homozygous small eye (Pax6(Sey)/Pax6(Sey)) mice.  Anatomy and Embryology 196:311-321. IF: 1.39

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